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Plantronics Headset- Famous for high noise cancellation

Some of these pro writers on the web are at a really top level that i wonder if any of them have ever written a book? well every so often i like to focus on these exceptional articles and here’s one i thought was remarkable the other day.

earpiecePlantronics has made a blast in the field of headsets because of unique and exclusive features its products are in great demand in the market. The most recent product of Plantronics is Plantronics CS540. It’s beneficial for those who wants to use it especially for music listening. The gadget is easy to use as it set around a central metal spring clip with the dimensions of 47.95 x 25.50 x 16.45mm, 11mm thick and 16mm fat at the end. Its weight is not more than 20g. It’s simply designed with an out wrapping of rubberized black; it permits you to attach everything up to 4mm thick. A Micro-USB charging socket is secreted on the base of the Clipper and lives under a separate flap, mirrored by the 3.5mm headphone jack on the top. It’s simple to control the gadget. On the body an encircling multi function button is erected that suggests the volume up and down. The distinctive thing about it is that it works like Bluetooth Headset. The multi tasking button has the features to dial, accept or reject a call.

Further more you can also pass over the unwanted tracks and can mute your mic while using a talk. It takes 2 hours for charging and will give you 6 hours of talk time. If you will use it you will be pleased with the incredible results.

Convenience is the 1st priority of the present age that can be enhanced by getting a cordless headset. If you want to realize yourself a free guy then engage yourself with the Cordless Plantronics Headset and get rid from your old weary cords. These headsets are available for the house use and also for the offices. As in call centers it prevents their longer tired. Because it’s a hand free device so it allows the mobile phone user to do his work also with doing any important work. You can change your mode by listening the music of your own choice. The additional function of amplifier cleans up the call and makes better the quality of your call. Its advantages don’t here but it also delivers numerous health benefits. The recent research has been proved that it has reduced the worries of different musical groups. Moreover it offers you a wider range of movement especially for the neck, head and shoulders. It has reduced the stress of your muscles. It makes easier to do your job with complete satisfaction.

The Plantronics CS540 Headset is famous for high noise cancellation. They are equipped with Plantronics’s own noise cancellation technology Noise Blackout Extreme. They have noise blackout microphones and dual microphones for adding clearness and lucidity. You can chat about job functions while performing your job. Your conversations will be clear for both of you and the other one to whom you correspond with while using the headsets. They also feature automatic volume control which bend to your environment which allows the conversation to sound completely natural and to flow with clearness despite loud noise and activity in your area.

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The Oculus Rift: virtual reality is no longer a joke

You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about headphone’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

The decades most exciting development in computer hardware looks a little like a fat black envelope stuck to a pair of ski goggles, and I had one strapped to my face two months ago as I sat at a desk in the Earls Court Exhibition Centre preparing to fly a Spitfire under a bridge.

Headphones over my ears replaced the thumping bass of the surrounding trade show with the spluttery growl of a Merlin engine. Looking down, I saw a pair of khakied knees and a gloved hand gripping a control yoke; above and to either side, the sun glittered through the cockpit canopy. As I flipped the aircraft into a turn and dive, my senses insisted that I was soaring, upside down, under an iron bridge and into a canyon. But my body and brain remained obstinately upright in a chair in west London, at the glorious mercy of a technology that promises to bring back that most laughable of Nineties computing obsessions: virtual reality.

This device is called the Oculus Rift, and it has come a long way since 2011, when Palmer Luckey, a 19-year-old Californian student, built the prototype from scavenged parts in his parents garage. Luckey was an enthusiastic collector of old VR hardware the clunky headsets that had enjoyed a brief tenure in Nineties amusement arcades and had long dreamt of bringing back the technology in a useful form.

But despite the colourful cyber-predictions of films such as Lawnmower Man, there were good reasons that the virtual reality craze had fizzled out by the millennium. The headsets were too heavy to wear for long, and immersion in the blocky graphics of these early virtual worlds came at a price: a stiff neck, motion sickness and the feeling of wading through treacle.

By 2011, however, the magic combination of accurate motion-sensing with lightweight, high-resolution displays no longer seemed so far off. As Luckey realised, the technology was by then integrated into most decent smartphones. So his prototype Rift used the equivalent of a large smartphone screen to display offset moving images, one for each eye, which the brain combined into an illusion of 3D depth. Head movements were tracked with phone-equivalent gyroscopes and accelerometers, adjusting the view so the user could look freely around a 3D world.

Two years on, Luckeys company Oculus VR is still piggybacking on vicious competition in the smartphone market, as its product lead Joseph Chen freely acknowledges.

Those guys are tearing each other apart trying to get the next best thing, he says. That has basically driven the costs down to where theyre affordable: displays and sensors that used to be hundreds of dollars now cost pennies. Oculus charges just $300 (180) for a low resolution developer kit a kit for companies interested in developing software for the device and has shipped more than 40,000 worldwide, the biggest deployment of virtual reality headsets in history. It has raised $91million (55.5 million) in investment funding and done this without actually having a product on the market: you cant buy it in shops until next year.

The excitement surrounding the Oculus was palpable at the Eurogamer Expo, the games show where I tried out its second-generation prototype. This is understandable: to many enthusiasts, the prospect of stepping wholesale into a virtual fantasy world fulfils one of the oldest promises of the medium.

An example of the view using an Oculus Rift

But theres more to this technology than gaming. Among the demonstrations Chen showed me was a London tourism experience, built from 360-degree camera views of locations in the capital by the media agency Visualise. The viewer begins perched on top of the London Eye wheel, staring out over the capital, and can beam into various 3D-modelled locations across town London Zoo, the Gherkin, Piccadilly Circus by a shift of visual focus.

Another demonstration by Arch Virtual, a business that creates 3D software for a wide range of clients, offered a virtual tour of an architects concept house. Using a controller, I was able to walk wherever I liked in the building. The sense of inhabiting real space in these demonstrations was astonishing.

Jon Brouchoud, the Wisconsin-based architect who runs Arch Virtual, says that using the Rift developer kit transformed the way he designs. Any time youre looking at an architectural illustration projected onto a screen its distorted, he tells me. Theres a natural distortion based on the way 3D maps onto a 2D surface. Put the same environment in the Oculus Rift and its completely different. Being able to stand inside a space, go back to the drawing board and then stand inside it again completely changes the way you design a building. If this isnt the game-changer for architecture, I dont know what is.

Arch Virtual, Brouchoud says, has also taken on several secret projects for medical clients. VR technology has already been used to aid neurological recovery from trauma, as well as to treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, post-stroke rehabilitation and phantom limb syndrome.

Andrew Poulter, an expert in computer science and simulation at the MoDs Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, envisages still other applications for the technology hinted at by the Rift. In the past two years the US army has spent $57million (35million) on an immersive training simulator called the Dismounted Soldier Training System, which tracks not just head movement but limb positioning and weapon movements.

In Britain, Poulter explains, head-mounted VR technology is still only being used experimentally, within a research context, although his lab has been looking closely at developer versions of the Rift.

A visitor to a trade show tries out the Oculus Rift

A good deal of British military training, Poulter explains, is still done with on-screen computer programs. But the Oculus Rift, he says, represents a new class of hardware with real potential. And it is games technology that now sets the trend for the defence industry, not the other way around. The defence budgets of even the largest countries are relatively small compared to the massive budgets that the entertainment industry has.

Its easy to forget that none of this technology is really available yet. Oculus is shipping only to developers with the technical know-how to plumb the depths of the software, while many of its prospective rivals remain shrouded in mystery. A few weeks ago, Sony filed a patent related to a head-mounted display, seeming to lend credence to rumours that it plans to launch a VR headset in 2014 for the PlayStation 4.

But the competition is certainly gathering. A device called the CastAR, which overlays 3D images onto a real-world view, recently completed a successful run on the crowdfunding site Kickstarter and has entered production. On the morning that I sat down to write this piece, news broke that another Oculus rival, the gloriously sci-fi sounding Avegant Glyph, will take to Kickstarter in January: it promises to project 3D images onto the human retina and fold up into a pair of headphones when youre done with it.

The team at Oculus, meanwhile, promises a further revolution in display technology when it exhibits a new prototype at the Consumer Electronics Show in January, and says it will have goggles in the hands of consumers by the end of the year. Looking forward into this immersive future, one is tempted to agree with the 90-year-old lady whose experience with the Oculus Rift has attracted more than two million viewers on YouTube.

This is something else, she exclaims raptly, clutching the visor to her face with both hands. Am I still sitting where I was? Holy mackerel!

A two-way radio has to be able to work quickly and efficiently.

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THE SPECS
The clarity of digital audio is undeniable. But if you still prefer analogue, then don’t despair. The DP 2400 is completely comfortable handling both analogue and digital signals.
But there’s a lot more it can do besides that.
The DP 2400 can even use its ‘IP Site Connect’ function to expand the capability of the device via the Internet. In addition, the ‘capacity plus’ function can use a single-site trunking system to enable over a thousand voice or data transfer-users without adding any new frequencies. It can even use an (optional) ‘linked capacity plus’ feature (a multi-site version of the ‘capacity plus’ function) that works in tandem with the IP functionality to ensure even broader fields of communication over greater distances.
There’s even an enhanced security function.
The Motorola DP 2400 comes in both VHF and UHF forms.
THE PRICE
At £284, this is a reasonably priced, yet high spec, device. With the release of the 3400, we can reasonably expect the price to drop a little more as well soon, but probably not by an incredible amount, as both models do seems to specialize in slightly different areas.
Overall, it does look like Motorola are offering a good radio-based product for your money, yet again.
THE PERFORMANCE
The design is hardy and utilitarian; this is the sort of two-way radio a security guard or professional soldier might use. Its tough, square edged and no-nonsense, but it still looks modern and professional. On top of this, the DP 2400’s ease of use makes the simplicity of the design a perfect marriage of model and operation.
As with most of Motorola’s designs, the DP 2400 is a tough little doohickey. The bodywork is so tightly sealed, in fact, that it is almost completely dust and sand proof and has a water protection rating of IP55 (that means you can use it in the rain, but you probably can’t take it snorkelling).
The audio performance of the DP 2400 is nothing short of spectacular. It even adjusts the levels to compensate for background noise automatically.
In fact, so high performance is this radio, that it actually meets US military standard 810 C D E F and G.
The only negative we could find was that the design was slightly bulky and the battery was a little heavy, however, the battery life is so good that we really don’t mind. Besides, it’s reassuring to be absolutely sure that you aren’t about to lose the product (you’d soon notice if you dropped it).
As an optional extra, you can even get a function that will interrupt an existing signal in order to deliver critical information without waiting for a line to close/open.
THE VERDICT
It really does seem as if Motorola have thought of everything this time around. What we’ve got here is a two-way radio that is pretty close to perfection. It seems to do anything you could possibly want it to and, when ‘pimped out’ with all the optional extras, it will surely do a lot more besides.
There aren’t really any downsides with this product, it works extremely well, is pretty much top of the line in its price range and is bang up to date technologically. What more can you ask for?
For more information on the Motorola DP2400 2 way radio visit 2wayradionline.co.uk

http://www.motorola.com/Business/XU-EN/Product+Lines/MOTOTRBO/Portables/DP+3400_Loc:XU-EN,XC-EN,XM-EN,XE-EN,XN-EN,PK-EN

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