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Playing Online A Lot? In Need Of A Decent Headset?

Article of the Day………ok so i don’t have an article each day, but when i get a chance I’ll post content I find fascinating. Fortunate enough here is one of these articles that I read and needed to share. If you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one that tells one and all you loved something, rather then you sat on your arse and watched Television!

Are you having trouble with hearing the insults being hurled at you when you play games online? Its bad enough that you’re being screamed at in a language you can barely comprehend, let alone when you can’t hear most of what’s being said.

The Internet has opened the world up to people in ways that would have been inconceivable just a few short decades ago. In bygone times, there would be no way for me to maintain complicated and close friendships with people who live thousands of miles away, but today? Today I maintain regular contact with distant relatives both at home and abroad.

Whilst I was at University, I wrote a paper on the lack of accurate representation of first nations people in American media. As a British person, to compile the massive amount of data I used (which included interviews, up to date anthropological studies and historical anecdotes) would have been next to impossible without the Internet. I also befriended one of my interviewees and we have a friendship that continues to this day, despite never having met face to face. That’s just one of the many great things about the Internet.

Politically, the Internet has made it harder for the governments of the world to perform their usual scaremongering and war waging tactics (harder, but not impossible, sadly). In the past, the neighbouring countries of A and B never had contact with each other beyond killing each other over a piece of paper or some drunk diplomat’s off colour remarks every few years, but today, the people of A can exchange emails with the people of B and talk to them openly and frankly. This means that if the government of B tells its people that the citizens of A eat their own children, a quick email or Skype call can confirm whether or not this is the case. This might help to explain why they keep trying to censor the net? Perhaps freedom of speech makes a better theory than practice in their eyes?

Of course, its not all serious stuff like wars and University assignments, for much of the time, it’s the games that do the talking and playing together benefits from much the same sociological effects as a free ranging chat does. See? You’re not wasting your time, you’re saving the world, man.

This site is full of links to news, reviews and places to buy the very best headsets around. If you’re going to play collaboratively, then you really do need a top quality headset and if you want one of those, you’re certainly in the right place. With a new headset, you can explore the world in the most modern and up to date way, with all the cursing, belittling and trash talking intact. That has to be worth something, doesn’t it? Whatever, I’m off to kill some zombies.

Latest bluetooth earpiece Arrives!

With such a lot of information around the internet about radio earpiece’s it’s hard to discover the top and most candid articles. here is a piece of writing from a reputable website that i believe to be true, don’t quote me on it but please read and enjoy

headset. earphonesThe bluetooth earpiece has become a very popular product device these days.
It has been a very enchanting product round across the whole globe. Due to its great performance and service it has become needful product nowadays. There are a number of companies manufacturing bluetooth earpiece these days and it becomes very difficult for the customers to take correct decisions.
Improper and wrong decisions also results into loss of money and time.
 
To avoid such situations we bring this wonderful and magnificent bluetooth earpiece for our readers. This is a satisfactory product with effective functioning. There are various use and advantages of this product in which the feasibility remains at the top. With the help of this bluetooth earpiece it becomes very easy for the users to talk easily while performing some other work.
This bluetooth earpiece is wireless and hence less chaotic. They easily get fitted into the ears. It is a beautiful product designed to perfection. It adds a bold look to the user personality.
 
The shape and size of this bluetooth earpiece is compact. They are small in size and less in weight. They can be easily carried out. The operating range supported by this bluetooth earpiece is up to 10 meters. It allows a calling time of 8 hours and a stand by time of 200 hours.
 
The quality of sound in this bluetooth earpiece is unmatched. It is very sharp and clear. The outside noise is restricted to a great extent in this bluetooth earpiece offering an interrupted and easy conversation. If you are fond of music then this product is the right choice for you.

Listening music over this bluetooth earpiece is very delighting. A multi function button is also available in this product which allows 3 way calling. This is a user friendly device.
 
The quality of this product is very high and makes the product very durable. It serves you for a longer time period if handled with care. This wonderful bluetooth earpiece is compatible with Bluetooth enable phones. One can also use this amusing product for gifting it to loved ones.

With all its wonderful features and stylish looks the price of this bluetooth earpiece still remains very economical.
 
It can be easily afforded under all types of budgets. It can be shopped conveniently through online shopping stores. Don’t miss out this breathtaking bluetooth earpiece at these unbeatable prices. Â

Here is more information in regards to DP3400 walkie Talkie Accessory look at our website.

Pink Headset

The world is full of really awesome, well written articles. If you find one which catches your eye, you have to repost it, well i do! so with consent of the original blogger i have re-posted this to enjoy

Looking around on the internet, there are dozens of different headsets and brands to choose from.
By the time that you are done sifting through all of the different options you may feel more lost than when you first started your search. Do not bother looking through all of the other lesser options for headsets as the best headset to consider buying is the Motorola Bluetooth H500.
Not only is Motorola at the head of the Bluetooth technology, it has repeatedly been named the best manufacturer to buy a Bluetooth headset from. These headsets last a lot longer than the competitions’, and they come in an assortment of colors. From what other company can you buy a pink headset?

The Motorola H500 is the best choice when searching for a headset.
The pink headset from Motorola is the safest and most stylish way to chat on the phone. Whether you are in a car or in a store, this headset maximizes your ability to use your hands for other activities. Critics rave how the Motorola Bluetooth H500 cuts down on hundreds of car accidents every year.

Buying a pink headset from Motorola is the best way to stay safe in a motor vehicle, and still be able to keep up with your family and friends.

The pink headset is also the most comfortable headset on the market. If you wear glasses, than you know how hard it is to find a headset that will rest easily behind your ear. It grips behind your ear firmly, and does not fall off like some of the other brands do.

Another plus about the Motorola H500 is how light and little the headset is. You can easily hide the pink headset behind your hair if you do not wish to stand out in public, and your ear will not grow sore from prolonged use. The audio also comes in loud and clear through the headset.

It is dangerous to turn the volume on a headset up too loud. Other brands that have low audio clarity are slowly damaging your ears, because you have to turn up the volume really loud in order to hear the speaker through the headset. Therefore, if you are in need of buying a new headset than choose the Motorola Bluetooth H500 if you want a product which does not damage your ears, fall off, or seem obnoxiously big.

The Klipsch X4i Review

headset. earphonesWhat would you know, this site About keyword is definitely interesting, i look forward to you enjoy it

Bass-boosted earphones are so much the norm at this point that to release a pair with merely moderate bass response almost seems like a gamble. So, credit is due to Klipsch—the X4i, at $149.99 (direct) represents the mix with clarity and brightness, and not gobs of booming bass. It can still reproduce sub-bass lows that you’ll find on electronic and hip hop tracks, but it does so without allowing them to overtake the mids and highs of the mix. The non-flashy, all-business Klipsch X4i makes a strong case for the attention of those seeking a near-flat response earphone pair. An inline remote control and microphone for mobile devices, as well as a healthy portion of included accessories, adds to the X4i’s value.

Design
You could call it a victory of substance over style—visually, the X4i is fairly barebones and nondescript, but in no way unattractive. A black linguini-esque cable and the bronze Klipsch logo emblazoned on the outer earpieces are the only real design elements to speak of. The miniature metallic rimmed earpieces don’t tug down on the ears with much weight at all, which makes the fit secure and comfortable over long listening periods.

An inline three-button remote control and microphone for iOS devices allows for answering calls, playback and track navigation control, as well as volume adjustments. Klipsch X4i inline

A total of five eartip pairs ship with the X4i, in a variety of sizes and shapes—most are standard rounded clear silicone eartips, but there also flange-shaped options. The X4i also ships with a tiny black zip-up protective pouch and a shirt clip.

Performance
On tracks with serious sub-bass content, like the Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the X4i delivers the deep bass without distortion, even at top, unsafe listening levels. However, any bass fiends seeking super-boosted low-end will likely be disappointed with the X4i, which can handle subwoofer style bass, but delivers it in a subtle, dialed-back manner. There’s plenty of low-end here compared to a clinical-sounding, strictly flat-response pair, but the X4i’s sound signature favors the mids and highs, and an overall crispness, over booming lows.

This means on a track like Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” the vocals, guitar strumming, and percussion attacks are front and center, with a brightness and clarity that is striking. Equally noteworthy is the lack of over-the-top bass boosting—the drumming on this track can often receive a ridiculous amount of low-end from an overly bass-boosted pair, sounding unnatural and overtaking the balance of the mix. Through the X4i, however, the drums hardly sound as if they’ve received any low-end boosting at all—bass fans might even find them a tad thin, but this is not a track with a serious level of deep bass to begin with.

Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” on the other hand, has both intense sub-bass presence and an all-important percussive high-mid presence. The attack of the kick drum bass loop gets all of the treble edge it needs (and is often denied on bass-heavy earphones) to slice through the mix and stand in the forefront of the mix, along with the vocals. However, the sub-bass synth hits sound a bit weak here—we can hear their treble attack, as well, but we don’t get any of the thunderous sustain like you would on a PA system or an earphone or headphone [www.technologytimeline.net] pair with heavy sub-bass response. The end result is that while the track sounds crisp and clear, it’s not exactly like you’re at the club.

Classical tracks, like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances,” can sound a tad edgy and bright, and lacking in the lows. We get a great sense of the higher register strings and percussion, and the growl of brass instruments, but there’s not much in the way of bass presence here. The lower register strings don’t sound dead or devoid of low-end altogether, but they definitely take a backseat in the mix.

Basically, this is a pair for those who prefer near-flat-response sound signatures that favor mids and highs, crispness and clarity, without foregoing bass completely. The X4i has a certain level of richness in the lows, but by today’s standards, it is subtle. A breath of fresh air for me, but if you prefer mega-bass, you’ll want to steer your attention to the SOL Republic Amps HD In-Ear Headphones or the substantially more expensive Denon Urban Raver AH-C300 In-Ear Headphones, both solid in-ear options with more low-end power, if less overall balance in the mix. And if all of these are out of the your price range, consider the slightly less expensive Moshi Keramo, which offers a similar sound signature to the X4i, as does the TDK EB950 which sells online for a serious markdown from its list price. At $150, the Klipsch X4i delivers quality audio performance in a simple design, equipped with an inline remote and a fair amount of accessories. Bass lovers need not apply, but lovers of crisp or flat audio are encouraged to check the distortion-free, comfortable X4i out.

Guidelines Buying The Best Earphones in India

I am involved within the Internet Marketing Industry for over five years now. Although I’ve a day job as an plumber in an esteemed firm, I still find time to keep my personal blog and come up with 10 to 20 blog posts a day. Writing is his passion Earpiece by doing what he likes to do – write, write and write some more.

headset. earphonesHeadphones/ earphones are indispensable accessories for music lovers on the move.
And given the number of brands and the kind of competition that the market is filled with, buying the best earphones in India can be a difficult choice. To deal with this, one must prioritise his needs and decide on the features first, and go for headphones, headsets and earphones that can be called good from an overall perspective.

Also, it is advisable to opt for headphones from reputable brands as they seldom compromise with the quality and give the consumer the best in technology.
Let us take a look at some of the things that the buyer ought to spare a thought on when he intends to buy the best earphones in India. These if overlooked or compromised with may spoil the music listening experience.

The type – Earphones can be divided into two types, earbuds and in canal earphones. The former comes in the form of tiny modules which sit nicely inside the ear. The latter, finer and costlier, goes a little farther and fits right inside the ear. Both the types are intra aural and put straight into the ear canal, and strongly influence the overall fit.

The design and purpose/ primary use – Designs of the headphones ought to be purpose oriented as different layouts define the type of usage the headphone/ earphone is dedicated to. The purpose, whether the music accessory is meant for general or professional use, gaming or entertainment, sports or workouts, should therefore be kept in mind.

The kind of music that is to be played – Headphones are often categorised on the basis of the type of music they are made to play, e.g. hip hop, rock & pop, jazz, classical, music & entertainment, speech, gaming, communications, etc. Choosing a headphone that is meant for gaming but using it for listening to classical music might not be that rewarding a process.
So the accessory has to be selected according to the kind of music that is to be played.

The sound quality – The headphone/ earphone should offer musical balance and an acceptable reproduction of sound. Stereo sound, proper bass to enhance the low definition sound of MP3s, excellent levels of detail and an advanced acoustic system are some of the features that listeners usually look for in their ‘ideal’ headphones.

A strong battery/ replaceable cable – The headphone ought to have a powerful battery if it is wireless and come with a strong as well as replaceable cable if it is wired.

Wearability and durability – The headphone/ earphone has to come with a promise of longevity and a decent shelf life, and complemented with utmost wearing comfort.
Others features that would give the headphone/ earphone a cut above the rest may include dynamic driver systems, noise cancelling technology, Bluetooth capability (for wireless earphones), built-in controls, compatibility with in-flight entertainment systems and the like.

Listed below are some of the best Sennheiser earphones that have made their entry into the Indian market and received a lot of positive reviews. They are as follows:
The CXC 700, the MX 170, the MX 270, the MX 470, the MX 580, the CX 215 (Blue, Bronze, Green, Orange, Red) and the MX 365 (Blue, Bronze).

If you liked this write-up and you would certainly such as to get additional facts concerning Motorola Headsets kindly see our own webpage.

What are the most effective gaming headsets (with mics)?

Can’t get over how cheap the headphone is now, an incredible deal for any top-end product!

headphonesHi and welcome to the brand new group of advice to those headset inquiries. Ever wanted to learn about something headphone, earphone or receiver related? Now’s your chance. Due to a great amount of questions we are so frequently asked, we’ve reached into our mailbag and chosen the 9 most significant (and most frequently submitted) questions. Enjoy.

Oh, by the way, if your query is not below, then merely send us an communication and come back in a few… you could see it featured within the later series. Thanks.

There is no denying the World-wide-web has introduced the whole planet closer together. Not only is it a great source for like minded folks to share testimonies and insights with each other, its also a wonderful way of gathering your neighbours in the worldwide society of which we’re all a part.

These days, when the newsreaders inform you that the people of some distant land are thoroughly evil and conspiring to return to the house when you’re sleeping and kill you and everyone you worry about in various awful ways, you do not have to simply sit back and believe it. Most of the time, you are able to just drop these faraway people a line and ask them for yourselves. I usually find that they principally live very comparable lives to my very own, which basically revolves about eating cereal, reading comic publications and playing The Ramones all day long.

Another smart way to distribute international peace and harmony is by waging all our future wars digitally, I advanced a theory several months ago (in an editorial for another website) that if we might have all our wars via ‘Call Of Duty’ instead of essentially, the world would be a much better spot. Then we might all go get some cereal (For myself, I am into ‘Golden Grahams’ in the mean time) and listen to The Ramones. We’re closer than ever to the dream, I feel, and the gaming headphone revolution is bringing us there on time.

So, with peace on Earth decisively in mind, I decided to pick the top 3 gaming headphones (with microphones) on sale right now. Fight the ability, brothers and sisters. Right on.

1) SteelSeries Siberia V2: When you’re a PC For the |General|Hardcore| gamer, you actually can’t go wrong here. Though the Siberia will set you back lots of money (Ł70 to be precise), they are unequivocally the best PC headphones around. They aren’t wireless, which does work against them, but the reviews, anywhere you search, are collectively glowing.
2) Turtle Beach X12: This pair will handle all sound from either your Xbox 360 or your PC and can duplicate crystal clear sound with pin dropping precision. They are costly, but worth the money in case you’ve got it to spare.
3) Logitech Vantage USB Headset: Now, for those who have not got sufficient money to afford the other two, I have included this Logitech headphone intended primarily to be used with the Playstation 3. It includes a noise cancellation function with a very quality microphone. It only has 1 speaker, but at less than Ł20, it’s still an excellent quality mid range option.

Naturally, you’ll find hundreds of various designs around to choose from, but based on what you like and the amount you would like to spend; these are most likely your greatest bets.

$100-headphone review What does a Benjamin get you

headphones$100-headphone review: What does a Benjamin get you?
This site was fascinating to me so i just had to share with all my visitors

Every type of electronic gadget has pricey, top-of-the-line models that provide phenomenal performance. But most of us have a gadget-shopping sweet spot: We look for the products that make us happy enough that spending more would be a waste.

Though many audio fans tout pricey audiophile headphones that cost hundreds of dollars (or more!), the sweet spot for full-size cans has, over the past decade, gotten less and less expensive. I tested five popular models that you can easily find for under $100, as well as one that competes with them for significantly less, to see what a reasonable budget gets you. All the models I tested use a full-size, closed design. Some are intended for home or studio use, while others include mobile-friendly features. (For more about the different types of headphones, consult our headphone buying guide.)

denon ah d510r over ear headphones
Denon’s AH-D510R Over-Ear Headphones
Denon AH-D510R Over-Ear Headphones
In the middle of Denon’s “classic” full-size headphone lineup sits the $109 AH-D510R Over-Ear Headphones. The earpieces are made of light metal, embossed with the Denon logo, and are suspended from gimbals that have L and R markings engraved in them. The earpieces rotate 90 degrees to lay flat, but the headband itself does not fold. There’s plenty of plastic in the construction, and picking up the headphone doesn’t impart a sense of quality.

The AH-D510R’s faux-leather earpads aren’t especially soft and don’t provide much noise isolation, but they fit nicely over the ears and remain comfortable thanks to the light weight of the headphone. The metal headband is covered in a brushed-metal-like plastic with thin, black padding around the top section—again, because the headphone is light, this thin padding isn’t uncomfortable, and I was able to wear the AH-D510R for extended periods.

A thin, non-coiled cable exits each earpiece, and a three-button, Apple-style inline remote/microphone module sits on the left cable. The remote’s buttons are small but easy to find and use by touch, and the inline mic produces better-than-average sound quality, though the output is a bit low.

I didn’t find much to like here in terms of sound quality. The AH-D510R’s sound signature is skewed heavily toward bass—so much so that the mids and highs, which already sound muted and veiled, get buried. And even the bass has issues: There isn’t much definition, and much of the emphasis is in the mid-bass region—response tapers off at the lower frequencies. While I admit to being generally critical of the current trend of over-emphasized bass, the AH-D510R all but abandons the upper two thirds of the audible frequency range. There’s also a significant lack of depth in the audio presentation.

I’m a pretty big Denon fan, and I’ve owned and loved some great Denon equipment, so it’s difficult to express how disappointed I was by the AH-D510R. It offers sufficient comfort and a decent remote/microphone, but lackluster build, appearance, and sound quality.

house of marley rise up over ear headphones
House of Marley’s Rise Up Over Ear Headphones
House of Marley Rise Up Over Ear Headphones
House of Marley offers headphones and audio systems, but also bags and jewelry. The company emphasizes sustainability and earth-friendliness, noting the extensive use of recycled and recyclable materials in its products. The Rise Up Over Ear Headphones exemplifies this corporate philosophy, and despite a $150 MSRP, it regularly sells for $90 or less.

The sustainability message comes through loud and clear even before you open the box, as the packaging shouts its recycled/recyclable nature, looking and feeling like rough, crude cardboard. No extras are included except a unique, semi-rigid carrying case that resembles a small portfolio. The Rise Up’s sturdy metal headband is sheathed in a minimally padded canvas cover, and the earpieces are hinged for folding. The Rise Up is available in several designs, including Blue Denim, Camo, Carmel, and Saddle; the Rasta model I tested sported earpieces with a green, yellow, and red canvas covering. The thin, fabric-covered cable on the Rasta version continues the tricolor scheme, but adds black to the striping, and is fairly resistant to tangling and kinking. An inline three-button remote/mic module sits on the cable.

The Rise Up headphone is about average in weight for a full-size headphone, and the earpads are firm with a soft-cloth covering that’s comfortable on the ears. The headband is a bit tight, even on my average-sized noggin; the resulting pressure on the ears might make extended listening sessions uncomfortable, though the tight fit does keep the headphone in place—a plus for mobile use. Despite the tight fit, sound isolation is only average.

The inline remote is easy to use, with a full-length rocker switch for volume control and a small-but-easy-to-find play/pause/call button in the center. The microphone’s output level is about average, but the sound quality of the mic is excellent. My only complaint here is that a non-removable cable is an odd compromise on a portable headphone in this price range.

The company’s online PR material frequently references House of Marley’s signature sound, and a brief listen makes it clear that this audio signature prizes bass above all else. Even at louder volumes, the mids and high frequencies never really make it past the strong bass emphasis. However, that bass is solid and clear, and it extends to the limit of my testing (20 Hz). Soundstage has decent depth, though the highs are muted to the extent that the breadth of the soundstage is compromised. I know there are serious bass fans out there, and the Rise Up offers powerful lows that are much less boomy than you usually find with bass-heavy headphones, but as someone who prefers a more-balanced approach, I personally felt as if there were cotton stuffed in my ears when listening.

The Rise Up is a well-built, apparently environmentally conscious headphone. It’s not a headphone for audiophiles or those who prefer balanced sound, but for bass fan who also want to make a fashion statement, The Rise Up is worth a listen.

monoprice premium hi fi dj style over the ear pro headphone 8323
Monoprice’s Premium Hi-Fi DJ Style Over-the-Ear Pro Headphone
Monoprice Premium Hi-Fi DJ Style Over-the-Ear Pro Headphone (8323)
When you hear the word “Monoprice,” you probably think of cheap cables. That’s likely to change soon, as the company has been steadily expanding into other electronics markets by using a unique business model: products that are good enough, at prices that are much lower than anyone else. The Premium Hi-Fi DJ Style Over-the-Ear Pro Headphone (8323), which sits at the top of Monoprice’s full-size headphone lineup, is a prime example. It’s a solid headphone that lists—be seated, put down sharp objects, turn off machinery, remove liquids from mouth—for roughly $24. (Monoprice’s prices change frequently, so you may find that when you visit the product page, the price is $23.51, or $25.17, or $22.84.) More important, the sound and build quality is good enough to include in this group, despite the headphone’s low cost.

Of course, the packaging of the 8323, as I’ll call it from here on out, is minimal: a thin-cardboard box, with the headphones nestled in white, vacuum-formed plastic. (The upside is that there’s none of the dreaded hard-clear plastic to cut through.) Included are a 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor and two non-coiled cables: a thin, three-foot one and a thick, ten-foot one. Neither includes an inline remote/mic module.

Except for the silver Monoprice logo on each earpiece, the MHP-839 is entirely black. The headband and earpieces are made of sturdy plastic, and the ends of the headband are double-hinged, allowing full articulation of the earpieces. The earpieces also swivel horizontally slightly, helping you get a flush fit. Overall, the build quality is solid, and the material appear to be of high quality. In fact, in both appearance and feel, the MHP-839 is quite similar to the Sennheiser HD 280 Pro, below.

The 8323 isn’t light, but it’s about average for headphones of this type, and it’s pretty comfortable. The earpads are soft, with adequate padding covered in black faux leather. The padded headband provides a good range of adjustability, and its design is unlikely to snag loose hair.

The build of the 8323 is impressive given the price, but its audio value is even more striking: Put simply, no $25 full-size headphone should sound this good. You don’t get audiophile-level sound quality, but it’s far, far better than you’d expect at this price. The flaws? The soundstage is flat, and there’s a veiled, slightly cardboard coloration to the music. The low end is slightly boosted, giving the 8323 a “warm” character, though it’s not enough to upset the overall balance. The mids and high frequencies are pushed a bit to the background, with a corresponding loss in detail. But I’m going out of my way to point out the 8323’s flaws. For under $25, it sound great, especially at the low end, as bass is full and solid, with all but the lowest octave reproduced faithfully. When fed really low signals (20Hz), the 8323 just steps out of the way and produces no audible distortion.

Not everyone needs (or wants) audiophile-caliber headphones—in fact, most don’t. Which means that for most listeners, the 8323 is unquestionably good enough. It doesn’t sound as good as the best full-size headphones that squeak in under $100, but the 8323 embarrasses many costing much more. It’s also a great option for situations in which potential loss or damage makes using expensive headphones unwise.

sennheiser hd 280 pro
Sennheiser’s HD 280 Pro
Sennheiser HD 280 Pro
Sennheiser has been making audio products since the smoke from World War II cleared, and it’s established a widely respected name, especially among audiophiles. The company’s current lineup includes headphones that range from budget portables to models costing well above $1000. The HD 280 Pro sits at the lower end of that range, but it’s no cheapie, and the Pro in its name isn’t merely marketing—this rugged headphone is equally suitable for home and studio use. It carries a list price of $100 to $150, depending on the current state of the ever-changing Sennheiser website, but it’s regularly available for for less than $100.

The HD 280 is very sturdy, constructed mostly of a heavy plastic that offers a bit of a soft-touch finish. The design is utilitarian, with little concession to fashion. The earpieces are double-hinged to fold into the headband for portability. The headband is lightly padded and designed to make hair snags unlikely. The soft, well-cushioned earpads fully envelop the ears, and, with help from ample pressure from the headband, offer great sound isolation. (The strong squeeze might bother some, but it should loosen up a bit over time.) Despite the on-ear pressure, the HD 280 Pro is heavy enough to slide a bit if, for example, you’re lying on your back—or if your dancing gets too exuberant.

The only extra included in the package is a screw-on, 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor. A long, coiled cable exits the bottom of—and is permanently attached to—the left earpiece. You get no inline remote/mic, befitting the intended home and studio use.

The HD 280 is a great-sounding headphone. Bass is solid, authoritative, and deep, with even extreme lows handled exceptionally well, and there’s no bass bleed into the lower midrange. The mids are full, smooth, and natural, with little coloration—male and female voices sound like male and female voices. And high frequencies are crisp, clear, and detailed. The HD 280’s studio aspirations are not at all unfounded, as this headphone lets you hear it all.

If I were pressed to criticize the HD 280 Pro, I would say that compared to the excellent bass and treble, the midrange frequencies can seem slightly recessed with some recordings, and there’s a slight V-pattern to the HD 280 Pro’s frequency response—the extreme highs and lows are slightly emphasized. With certain recordings, or music with emphasized low and high frequencies, listening through the HD 280 Pro might become fatiguing. Nevertheless, the HD 280 delivers all the sound, in precise detail, and its excellent isolation is useful not only in presenting solid bass but also in helping you appreciate a wide, spacious soundstage.

The HD 280 Pro is a great choice if you want to hear everything your recordings have to offer. It has the flat, accurate response and great detail needed by a pro in the studio, with just enough bass and treble emphasis to entertain the consumer. And it’s built to last.

shure srh440
Shure’s SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones
Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones
No one involved with audio is unfamiliar with the Shure name, which is synonymous with higher-end in-ear monitors, microphones, and phono cartridges. So I was interested to see what the company’s could offer in a serious under-$100 headphone. Slotted near the bottom of Shure’s headphone lineup, the SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones lists for $125, but has a street price of $99.

The SRH440 sports a simple, conventional—almost retro—design, but despite a bit of visible wiring running from the earpieces to the headband, seems solidly made. Much of the headphone is made of plastic, but it’s high-quality plastic that feels sturdy and is pleasant to the touch. The left and right earpieces are clearly labeled with small, blue and red plastic inserts, and a silver Shure logo is visible on each earpiece.

The earpieces are double-hinged, allowing them to fold into the headband for storage or transport. A nice touch is the capability for the earpieces to rotate in their mounts while maintaining contact with your head. The single-sided cable is terminated in a standard 1/8-inch plug, and though it’s detachable, the connection to the headphone itself uses a non-standard bayonet mount, which means you won’t be able to easily swap the long (and heavy) coiled cable with a shorter straight cable. On the other hand, the cable is reinforced nicely at each end—the spots where cables often fail. The cable doesn’t include an inline remote or microphone; the included extras are a 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor and a soft, faux-leather carrying case.

I’ve read complaints claiming that the SRH440 has a tight fit, but my average-size head didn’t find that to be an issue—for example, it wasn’t tight enough to keep the headphone in place when lying on my back. (My test model was not brand new, so it’s possible that the fit has loosened up over time.) Partly because I didn’t get a tight fit, noise isolation was only average. The replaceable earpads are nicely padded and covered in faux leather, and they fit comfortably over the ears; the headband, on the other hand, offers very little padding. Still, as long as temperatures are low, the headphone is comfortable for long listening sessions—as with many headphones of this type, and especially those with “pleather” earpads, your ears will get warm after a while.

Like the HD 280 Pro, the SRH440 is a great-sounding headphone. Its audio output is flat and accurate with full, solid bass that’s well-defined with absolutely no bleeding into the midrange. The low frequencies are solid down to 20 Hz, without the over-emphasized low-frequency bump that bassheads crave (and, sadly, that many consumers have come to accept as normal). What I really like is the way the SRH440 plays the lower midrange strongly and cleanly but without a hint of bass until real bass is present in the recording, when it comes through appropriately. The midrange is also smooth and even, and highs also are clear and detailed, blending well for a very balanced presentation.

Soundstage is about average, with great left-right placement but not a lot of depth—not a surprise in this price range. One criticism (which for some people might be a strength) is that the overall sound character can seem overly subdued—whereas the HD 280 Pro presents a much more immediate, dynamic impact, the SRH440 is more laid back. Nevertheless, this is a very minor criticism of a very good sounding headphone. Its neutral-but-relaxed character makes it great for long listening sessions.

Overall, the SRH440’s solid construction and cabling mean that it should hold up over time, and its accurate, neutral sound won’t lose its appeal. At this price, it’s a steal.

Sony’s MDR-7506 Professional Headphones enjoys almost mythical status among headphone geeks, as it’s been on the market since 1991 and has earned a reputation among professionals and amateurs alike as an audio workhorse. (The MDR-7506 is externally similar to Sony’s MDR-V6; at times, it’s apparently been internally identical, as well, but that doesn’t seem to be the case currently.) The MDR-7506 lists for $130, but commonly sells for under $80.

Befitting its age, the MDR-7506 is a conventionally designed headphone that’s survived long enough to seem retro. The headband is metal, sheathed in what looks and feels like real leather, and lightly padded. Red and blue plastic inserts in the headband make identifying left and right sides easy, and the earpieces are double-hinged to fold nicely into the headband for storage or transport. Small wires are visible running from the earpieces to the headband, as are a few screws fastening the plastic and metal bits together. Beautiful it is not, but it truly looks like what you’d imagine a “studio-monitor” headphone to be. The long, coiled cable is not removable, nor does it include an inline remote or microphone. Included are a faux-leather carrying pouch and a threaded, 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor.

The easily replaceable, pleather-covered oval ear pads are soft and comfortable, though as with the Shure model above, your ears will heat up after a while. (Velour earpads, available from third-party vendors, improve the 7506’s comfort dramatically.) The headband pressure is a little on the high side, but that pressure makes for a good seal and good sound isolation—and it does loosen up over time. Since the MDR-7506 is a bit lighter than most headphones of this size, it stays securely on your head without squeezing too much. Heat aside, this is a headphone that can be comfortably worn for long sessions.

The MDR-7506 is a great-sounding headphone. Solid bass extends cleanly to 20 Hz while never creeping into the lower midrange. The midrange itself is clear and natural, and the detailed, crisp highs bring out nuances in your music that you might not have heard before. Soundstage and instrument placement are very good, though better left to right than front to back.

Best of all, there is no “but”—there’s a reason this guy has been around more than twenty years. It’s of course not perfect—the design is ancient, in summer your ears will quickly sweat if you haven’t swapped out the earpads, the soundstage is merely good, and I’d love to see a replaceable cable—but the MDR-7506 will shame headphones several times its price. When asked, this is the full-size headphone I recommend most frequently.

Buying advice
While this article began with the premise of reaping the benefits of trickle-down technology, it’s remarkable that among the best headphones in the group is one that dates back to 1991. That doesn’t completely invalidate the hypothesis, however, as the $25 Monoprice 8323 is a truly astounding bargain—it’s difficult to reconcile this kind of quality with such a low price. The Denon and House of Marley headphones, on the other hand, miss the mark, plain and simple.

As for the remaining three, what’s noteworthy is not only how very good each is, but also how similar they are to each other. Each comes in relatively plain packaging, and the design of each is decidedly “old school studio”—almost enough to be retro hip. But what you give up in looks you reap in sound quality, build quality, and comfort. The Shure SRH440 has an unobtrusive, reserved output that’s reminiscent of what was once called the “New England Sound” of speakers from makers such as KEF, KLH, and Advent. Sennheiser’s HD 280 Pro spices things up a little, with a more dramatic soundstage, more kick to the bass, and more sparkle in the highs. It sounds great, but if the audio engineer mixing your music has also kicked up the bass and highs, you may end up with too much of a good thing. Sony’s MDR—7506, in my opinion, gets it right.

But the truth is that when it comes to sound quality, the Shure, Sennheiser, and Sony models are very similar to each other—and all very, very good. Unless you’re a perfectionist audiophile (and we know who we are), there’s a good chance that $100 really is the sweet spot for full-size headphones. And if even that’s too much for your wallet, the Monoprice 8323 is astonishingly close behind, making it the clear winner in terms of value.