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The Dead Actor’s Studio

What will you do if i said I had found a technological advancement article that is not only interesting but educational as well? I knew you would not believe me, so here it is the enlightening, excellent and fascinating piece

Imagine a young Marlon Brando starring alongside Johnny Depp, or Audrey Hepburn playing rival to Sandra Bullock as Marilyn Monroe stops by for a catty cameo.

Depending on how you look at it, this is either tantalizing ‘fantasy film making’ or else an utterly horrible, cash-in exercise in Hollywood excess. Whatever your viewpoint, it does seem likely that someone, somewhere will try this in the near future.

About three years ago, the news broke that George Lucas, the genius behind the ‘Star Wars’ merchandise (and a couple of related movies), was buying up the likeness rights to a plethora of iconic, yet deceased, leading men and famous actresses from Hollywood’s golden age. His plan? To use a concoction of existing footage, CGI and motion capture to create reasonable facsimiles of classic Hollywood stars and have them appear in future films, despite the notable handicap of being, well, dead.

Initially, it was just for one project, but it raised the prospect of other films being made, as well as a number of interesting philosophical issues.

The majority of critics reacted negatively to the notion of these ‘Franken-films’, some saying that the magic of an individual acting performance would be notably absent in the films, others upset that the actors themselves could potentially ‘star’ in projects that they may not have supported in life.

It really must be said, however, that blockbuster movies like 2009’s ‘Avatar’ and 2011’s ‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ already received plaudits for their use of motion capture techniques and CGI ‘acting’. It is an accepted part of modern cinema, like it or not.

Lest we forget, George Lucas’ own ‘Star Wars’ films also featured a number of purely CG characters. In our era, we are becoming very used to CG characters; even CG versions of real actors are commonplace. It really isn’t a huge leap of imagination (or available technology) to foresee deceased stars headlining blockbusters once again.

We are also living in a world that specializes in the glorification of deceased idols and recycled imagery (take a look at this month’s music magazines and count how many times you see Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain or other dead stars on the covers). Look at the movie magazines as they feature young DeNiro as Travis Bickle, or Ray Liotta as Henry Hill. We, as consumers, are being conditioned to expect our stars to be able to do anything we can imagine, including coming back from the dead.

Why we want it:

The question here, to at least some degree, is ‘do we want it?’ but for now, I’m going to be positive and assume that we do…

Bringing classic actors back to ‘life’ would be a daring and controversial decision and would inspire all kinds of debates. It would also, no doubt, stimulate the film industry by providing literally hundreds of thousands of new prospects, pairings and casting choices.

On the downside, it would probably create an updated version of the old Hollywood studio system that would likely prove to be a legal nightmare involving no small amount of heartache for the families of the stars being featured. It could also have the negative effect of holding down upcoming talent.

However, many Hollywood actors do what they do for a shot at immortality and this is, frankly, the closest that they are likely to get to that goal. It would not surprise me at all if ‘likeness rights’ contracts started containing an ‘after death’ clause that specified use of the actor’s image in posthumous film projects.

Culturally speaking, in a world where dead musicians like Hendrix and 2Pac routinely release albums and where popular music is dominated by the ‘sampling’ (and in some cases, outright theft) of other works, or where film texts constantly, almost obsessive-compulsively, reference each other (in what has become the intertextual equivalent of an M.C Escher drawing), rehashing the stars of the past seems like an obvious choice.

Dead icons could spice up Hollywood by adding controversy, class and bankability to the summer’s contrived blockbuster selection. Plus, all their skeletons, secrets and shameful actions are already a matter of public record, so there’s no ill-timed revelatory ‘gossip’ that’s going to rear up and threaten the production.

Even those who oppose the making of such movies will still have to watch them in order to write the requisite bad reviews, this simply proves the old adage that controversy generates cash.

When can we expect it?

Oh snap, it already happened. In the year 2000, actor Oliver Reed sadly died during the filming of Ridley Scott’s ‘Gladiator’. In order for him to finish what would become his final role, the VFX team created a CG ‘mask’ of Reed’s face and used a body double to complete their film.

Remember that car advert with Steve McQueen? It has already begun.

Real, workable CGI stars are already a reality, but the technology does not yet exist to create a completely CG James Dean for a sequel to ‘Rebel Without a Cause’. I’d give it maybe 10-20 years before we start seeing the stars in respectful, tasteful cameo roles, or else old actors performing alongside their younger selves. After that, it’ll be 3-5 years before we see the screen idols like Errol Flynn, Clark Gable and Grace Kelly headlining movies again.

Cool factor 3/5 – It really depends on how these ‘stars’ are handled. The results could, potentially, be beautiful codas to a star’s career (which is how they could be sold to the audience), but they could also be horribly insulting, denigrating the work of great actors and actresses. Time is going to tell, as usual…

$100-headphone review What does a Benjamin get you

$100-headphone review: What does a Benjamin get you?
Cant get over how economical the earpiece is now, an incredible deal for any top-end product!

Every type of electronic gadget has pricey, top-of-the-line models that provide phenomenal performance. But most of us have a gadget-shopping sweet spot: We look for the products that make us happy enough that spending more would be a waste.

Though many audio fans tout pricey audiophile headphones that cost hundreds of dollars (or more!), the sweet spot for full-size cans has, over the past decade, gotten less and less expensive. I tested five popular models that you can easily find for under $100, as well as one that competes with them for significantly less, to see what a reasonable budget gets you. All the models I tested use a full-size, closed design. Some are intended for home or studio use, while others include mobile-friendly features. (For more about the different types of headphones, consult our headphone buying guide.)

denon ah d510r over ear headphones
Denons AH-D510R Over-Ear Headphones
Denon AH-D510R Over-Ear Headphones
In the middle of Denons classic full-size headphone lineup sits the $109 AH-D510R Over-Ear Headphones. The earpieces are made of light metal, embossed with the Denon logo, and are suspended from gimbals that have L and R markings engraved in them. The earpieces rotate 90 degrees to lay flat, but the headband itself does not fold. Theres plenty of plastic in the construction, and picking up the headphone doesnt impart a sense of quality.

The AH-D510Rs faux-leather earpads arent especially soft and dont provide much noise isolation, but they fit nicely over the ears and remain comfortable thanks to the light weight of the headphone. The metal headband is covered in a brushed-metal-like plastic with thin, black padding around the top sectionagain, because the headphone is light, this thin padding isnt uncomfortable, and I was able to wear the AH-D510R for extended periods.

A thin, non-coiled cable exits each earpiece, and a three-button, Apple-style inline remote/microphone module sits on the left cable. The remotes buttons are small but easy to find and use by touch, and the inline mic produces better-than-average sound quality, though the output is a bit low.

I didnt find much to like here in terms of sound quality. The AH-D510Rs sound signature is skewed heavily toward bassso much so that the mids and highs, which already sound muted and veiled, get buried. And even the bass has issues: There isnt much definition, and much of the emphasis is in the mid-bass regionresponse tapers off at the lower frequencies. While I admit to being generally critical of the current trend of over-emphasized bass, the AH-D510R all but abandons the upper two thirds of the audible frequency range. Theres also a significant lack of depth in the audio presentation.

Im a pretty big Denon fan, and Ive owned and loved some great Denon equipment, so its difficult to express how disappointed I was by the AH-D510R. It offers sufficient comfort and a decent remote/microphone, but lackluster build, appearance, and sound quality.

house of marley rise up over ear headphones
House of Marleys Rise Up Over Ear Headphones
House of Marley Rise Up Over Ear Headphones
House of Marley offers headphones and audio systems, but also bags and jewelry. The company emphasizes sustainability and earth-friendliness, noting the extensive use of recycled and recyclable materials in its products. The Rise Up Over Ear Headphones exemplifies this corporate philosophy, and despite a $150 MSRP, it regularly sells for $90 or less.

The sustainability message comes through loud and clear even before you open the box, as the packaging shouts its recycled/recyclable nature, looking and feeling like rough, crude cardboard. No extras are included except a unique, semi-rigid carrying case that resembles a small portfolio. The Rise Ups sturdy metal headband is sheathed in a minimally padded canvas cover, and the earpieces are hinged for folding. The Rise Up is available in several designs, including Blue Denim, Camo, Carmel, and Saddle; the Rasta model I tested sported earpieces with a green, yellow, and red canvas covering. The thin, fabric-covered cable on the Rasta version continues the tricolor scheme, but adds black to the striping, and is fairly resistant to tangling and kinking. An inline three-button remote/mic module sits on the cable.

The Rise Up headphone is about average in weight for a full-size headphone, and the earpads are firm with a soft-cloth covering thats comfortable on the ears. The headband is a bit tight, even on my average-sized noggin; the resulting pressure on the ears might make extended listening sessions uncomfortable, though the tight fit does keep the headphone in placea plus for mobile use. Despite the tight fit, sound isolation is only average.

The inline remote is easy to use, with a full-length rocker switch for volume control and a small-but-easy-to-find play/pause/call button in the center. The microphones output level is about average, but the sound quality of the mic is excellent. My only complaint here is that a non-removable cable is an odd compromise on a portable headphone in this price range.

The companys online PR material frequently references House of Marleys signature sound, and a brief listen makes it clear that this audio signature prizes bass above all else. Even at louder volumes, the mids and high frequencies never really make it past the strong bass emphasis. However, that bass is solid and clear, and it extends to the limit of my testing (20 Hz). Soundstage has decent depth, though the highs are muted to the extent that the breadth of the soundstage is compromised. I know there are serious bass fans out there, and the Rise Up offers powerful lows that are much less boomy than you usually find with bass-heavy headphones, but as someone who prefers a more-balanced approach, I personally felt as if there were cotton stuffed in my ears when listening.

The Rise Up is a well-built, apparently environmentally conscious headphone. Its not a headphone for audiophiles or those who prefer balanced sound, but for bass fan who also want to make a fashion statement, The Rise Up is worth a listen.

monoprice premium hi fi dj style over the ear pro headphone 8323
Monoprices Premium Hi-Fi DJ Style Over-the-Ear Pro Headphone
Monoprice Premium Hi-Fi DJ Style Over-the-Ear Pro Headphone (8323)
When you hear the word Monoprice, you probably think of cheap cables. Thats likely to change soon, as the company has been steadily expanding into other electronics markets by using a unique business model: products that are good enough, at prices that are much lower than anyone else. The Premium Hi-Fi DJ Style Over-the-Ear Pro Headphone (8323), which sits at the top of Monoprices full-size headphone lineup, is a prime example. Its a solid headphone that listsbe seated, put down sharp objects, turn off machinery, remove liquids from mouthfor roughly $24. (Monoprices prices change frequently, so you may find that when you visit the product page, the price is $23.51, or $25.17, or $22.84.) More important, the sound and build quality is good enough to include in this group, despite the headphones low cost.

Of course, the packaging of the 8323, as Ill call it from here on out, is minimal: a thin-cardboard box, with the headphones nestled in white, vacuum-formed plastic. (The upside is that theres none of the dreaded hard-clear plastic to cut through.) Included are a 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor and two non-coiled cables: a thin, three-foot one and a thick, ten-foot one. Neither includes an inline remote/mic module.

Except for the silver Monoprice logo on each earpiece, the MHP-839 is entirely black. The headband and earpieces are made of sturdy plastic, and the ends of the headband are double-hinged, allowing full articulation of the earpieces. The earpieces also swivel horizontally slightly, helping you get a flush fit. Overall, the build quality is solid, and the material appear to be of high quality. In fact, in both appearance and feel, the MHP-839 is quite similar to the Sennheiser HD 280 Pro, below.

The 8323 isnt light, but its about average for headphones of this type, and its pretty comfortable. The earpads are soft, with adequate padding covered in black faux leather. The padded headband provides a good range of adjustability, and its design is unlikely to snag loose hair.

The build of the 8323 is impressive given the price, but its audio value is even more striking: Put simply, no $25 full-size headphone should sound this good. You dont get audiophile-level sound quality, but its far, far better than youd expect at this price. The flaws? The soundstage is flat, and theres a veiled, slightly cardboard coloration to the music. The low end is slightly boosted, giving the 8323 a warm character, though its not enough to upset the overall balance. The mids and high frequencies are pushed a bit to the background, with a corresponding loss in detail. But Im going out of my way to point out the 8323s flaws. For under $25, it sound great, especially at the low end, as bass is full and solid, with all but the lowest octave reproduced faithfully. When fed really low signals (20Hz), the 8323 just steps out of the way and produces no audible distortion.

Not everyone needs (or wants) audiophile-caliber headphonesin fact, most dont. Which means that for most listeners, the 8323 is unquestionably good enough. It doesnt sound as good as the best full-size headphones that squeak in under $100, but the 8323 embarrasses many costing much more. Its also a great option for situations in which potential loss or damage makes using expensive headphones unwise.

sennheiser hd 280 pro
Sennheisers HD 280 Pro
Sennheiser HD 280 Pro
Sennheiser has been making audio products since the smoke from World War II cleared, and its established a widely respected name, especially among audiophiles. The companys current lineup includes headphones that range from budget portables to models costing well above $1000. The HD 280 Pro sits at the lower end of that range, but its no cheapie, and the Pro in its name isnt merely marketingthis rugged headphone is equally suitable for home and studio use. It carries a list price of $100 to $150, depending on the current state of the ever-changing Sennheiser website, but its regularly available for for less than $100.

The HD 280 is very sturdy, constructed mostly of a heavy plastic that offers a bit of a soft-touch finish. The design is utilitarian, with little concession to fashion. The earpieces are double-hinged to fold into the headband for portability. The headband is lightly padded and designed to make hair snags unlikely. The soft, well-cushioned earpads fully envelop the ears, and, with help from ample pressure from the headband, offer great sound isolation. (The strong squeeze might bother some, but it should loosen up a bit over time.) Despite the on-ear pressure, the HD 280 Pro is heavy enough to slide a bit if, for example, youre lying on your backor if your dancing gets too exuberant.

The only extra included in the package is a screw-on, 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor. A long, coiled cable exits the bottom ofand is permanently attached tothe left earpiece. You get no inline remote/mic, befitting the intended home and studio use.

The HD 280 is a great-sounding headphone. Bass is solid, authoritative, and deep, with even extreme lows handled exceptionally well, and theres no bass bleed into the lower midrange. The mids are full, smooth, and natural, with little colorationmale and female voices sound like male and female voices. And high frequencies are crisp, clear, and detailed. The HD 280s studio aspirations are not at all unfounded, as this headphone lets you hear it all.

If I were pressed to criticize the HD 280 Pro, I would say that compared to the excellent bass and treble, the midrange frequencies can seem slightly recessed with some recordings, and theres a slight V-pattern to the HD 280 Pros frequency responsethe extreme highs and lows are slightly emphasized. With certain recordings, or music with emphasized low and high frequencies, listening through the HD 280 Pro might become fatiguing. Nevertheless, the HD 280 delivers all the sound, in precise detail, and its excellent isolation is useful not only in presenting solid bass but also in helping you appreciate a wide, spacious soundstage.

The HD 280 Pro is a great choice if you want to hear everything your recordings have to offer. It has the flat, accurate response and great detail needed by a pro in the studio, with just enough bass and treble emphasis to entertain the consumer. And its built to last.

shure srh440
Shures SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones
Shure SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones
No one involved with audio is unfamiliar with the Shure name, which is synonymous with higher-end in-ear monitors, microphones, and phono cartridges. So I was interested to see what the companys could offer in a serious under-$100 headphone. Slotted near the bottom of Shures headphone lineup, the SRH440 Professional Studio Headphones lists for $125, but has a street price of $99.

The SRH440 sports a simple, conventionalalmost retrodesign, but despite a bit of visible wiring running from the earpieces to the headband, seems solidly made. Much of the headphone is made of plastic, but its high-quality plastic that feels sturdy and is pleasant to the touch. The left and right earpieces are clearly labeled with small, blue and red plastic inserts, and a silver Shure logo is visible on each earpiece.

The earpieces are double-hinged, allowing them to fold into the headband for storage or transport. A nice touch is the capability for the earpieces to rotate in their mounts while maintaining contact with your head. The single-sided cable is terminated in a standard 1/8-inch plug, and though its detachable, the connection to the headphone itself uses a non-standard bayonet mount, which means you wont be able to easily swap the long (and heavy) coiled cable with a shorter straight cable. On the other hand, the cable is reinforced nicely at each endthe spots where cables often fail. The cable doesnt include an inline remote or microphone; the included extras are a 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor and a soft, faux-leather carrying case.

Ive read complaints claiming that the SRH440 has a tight fit, but my average-size head didnt find that to be an issuefor example, it wasnt tight enough to keep the headphone in place when lying on my back. (My test model was not brand new, so its possible that the fit has loosened up over time.) Partly because I didnt get a tight fit, noise isolation was only average. The replaceable earpads are nicely padded and covered in faux leather, and they fit comfortably over the ears; the headband, on the other hand, offers very little padding. Still, as long as temperatures are low, the headphone is comfortable for long listening sessionsas with many headphones of this type, and especially those with pleather earpads, your ears will get warm after a while.

Like the HD 280 Pro, the SRH440 is a great-sounding headphone. Its audio output is flat and accurate with full, solid bass thats well-defined with absolutely no bleeding into the midrange. The low frequencies are solid down to 20 Hz, without the over-emphasized low-frequency bump that bassheads crave (and, sadly, that many consumers have come to accept as normal). What I really like is the way the SRH440 plays the lower midrange strongly and cleanly but without a hint of bass until real bass is present in the recording, when it comes through appropriately. The midrange is also smooth and even, and highs also are clear and detailed, blending well for a very balanced presentation.

Soundstage is about average, with great left-right placement but not a lot of depthnot a surprise in this price range. One criticism (which for some people might be a strength) is that the overall sound character can seem overly subduedwhereas the HD 280 Pro presents a much more immediate, dynamic impact, the SRH440 is more laid back. Nevertheless, this is a very minor criticism of a very good sounding headphone. Its neutral-but-relaxed character makes it great for long listening sessions.

Overall, the SRH440s solid construction and cabling mean that it should hold up over time, and its accurate, neutral sound wont lose its appeal. At this price, its a steal.

Sonys MDR-7506 Professional Headphones enjoys almost mythical status among headphone geeks, as its been on the market since 1991 and has earned a reputation among professionals and amateurs alike as an audio workhorse. (The MDR-7506 is externally similar to Sonys MDR-V6; at times, its apparently been internally identical, as well, but that doesnt seem to be the case currently.) The MDR-7506 lists for $130, but commonly sells for under $80.

Befitting its age, the MDR-7506 is a conventionally designed headphone thats survived long enough to seem retro. The headband is metal, sheathed in what looks and feels like real leather, and lightly padded. Red and blue plastic inserts in the headband make identifying left and right sides easy, and the earpieces are double-hinged to fold nicely into the headband for storage or transport. Small wires are visible running from the earpieces to the headband, as are a few screws fastening the plastic and metal bits together. Beautiful it is not, but it truly looks like what youd imagine a studio-monitor headphone to be. The long, coiled cable is not removable, nor does it include an inline remote or microphone. Included are a faux-leather carrying pouch and a threaded, 1/8-inch-to-1/4-inch plug adaptor.

The easily replaceable, pleather-covered oval ear pads are soft and comfortable, though as with the Shure model above, your ears will heat up after a while. (Velour earpads, available from third-party vendors, improve the 7506s comfort dramatically.) The headband pressure is a little on the high side, but that pressure makes for a good seal and good sound isolationand it does loosen up over time. Since the MDR-7506 is a bit lighter than most headphones of this size, it stays securely on your head without squeezing too much. Heat aside, this is a headphone that can be comfortably worn for long sessions.

The MDR-7506 is a great-sounding headphone. Solid bass extends cleanly to 20 Hz while never creeping into the lower midrange. The midrange itself is clear and natural, and the detailed, crisp highs bring out nuances in your music that you might not have heard before. Soundstage and instrument placement are very good, though better left to right than front to back.

Best of all, there is no buttheres a reason this guy has been around more than twenty years. Its of course not perfectthe design is ancient, in summer your ears will quickly sweat if you havent swapped out the earpads, the soundstage is merely good, and Id love to see a replaceable cablebut the MDR-7506 will shame headphones several times its price. When asked, this is the full-size headphone I recommend most frequently.

Buying advice
While this article began with the premise of reaping the benefits of trickle-down technology, its remarkable that among the best headphones in the group is one that dates back to 1991. That doesnt completely invalidate the hypothesis, however, as the $25 Monoprice 8323 is a truly astounding bargainits difficult to reconcile this kind of quality with such a low price. The Denon and House of Marley headphones, on the other hand, miss the mark, plain and simple.

As for the remaining three, whats noteworthy is not only how very good each is, but also how similar they are to each other. Each comes in relatively plain packaging, and the design of each is decidedly old school studioalmost enough to be retro hip. But what you give up in looks you reap in sound quality, build quality, and comfort. The Shure SRH440 has an unobtrusive, reserved output thats reminiscent of what was once called the New England Sound of speakers from makers such as KEF, KLH, and Advent. Sennheisers HD 280 Pro spices things up a little, with a more dramatic soundstage, more kick to the bass, and more sparkle in the highs. It sounds great, but if the audio engineer mixing your music has also kicked up the bass and highs, you may end up with too much of a good thing. Sonys MDR7506, in my opinion, gets it right.

But the truth is that when it comes to sound quality, the Shure, Sennheiser, and Sony models are very similar to each otherand all very, very good. Unless youre a perfectionist audiophile (and we know who we are), theres a good chance that $100 really is the sweet spot for full-size headphones. And if even thats too much for your wallet, the Monoprice 8323 is astonishingly close behind, making it the clear winner in terms of value.

Best Noise-Canceling Headphones

This article is posted by the faithful authorization of radio accessory.com, which is the original blog. please get permission from that website before reposting this article.

audioAs a tech reporter/writer guy, I’m presumably an avowed early adopter who’s surfing a wave of new and unreleased gadgets all-day, everyday. For the purposes of my work life this is absolutely true, but outside the job this is hardly the case. Up until about a month ago, I had never even so much as used noise-canceling headphones. Now I can’t imagine ever taking them off.
Here’s the broad idea behind how noise cancellation works. As you cue up your desired audio diversions, microphones outside the headphones detect all that nasty environmental noise that would otherwise interfere, be it a noisy city street or the low-frequency drone of an airplane in flight. Because all sound waves have a mirror opposite of “anti-noise,” we can play that anti-noise into our ears and, for all intents and purposes, we can engineer silence.
Noise-canceling headphones take this bit of acoustics science and make it dead simple to apply. At a certain point these ceased being “noise-canceling headphones” and instead just become “really great headphones.” That’s the thing about this review – all of the products below are great. I tried three different models from three different manufacturers and each one was tremendously effective in reducing or eliminating the din of the subway or sidewalk. There are things to love about each one, so let’s get into it.
Here are my thoughts on three models I tested.
Logitech UE 9000 – $319.99

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Robots in space, the Kirobo

earpieceBoy. The new technology is wonderful. I mean it is just so gorgeous so advanced. I pity those who grew up without the technological advancement.

Robots are in the news a lot lately. From Google’s mysterious plans to do something vaguely robotic over the next ten years (we’re not allowed to know exactly what), to Amazon’s proposal to build flying drones for international deliveries, it seems that the metal munchkins are everywhere, but none are as cute, nor as interesting, as Kirobo.

Resembling a cross between a mid-90’s SNES protagonist and an overgrown Lego man, Kirobo the robot stands at just 33CM tall (which is still positively gargantuan for a Lego man). His claim to fame? Kirobo is the world’s first robot astronaut and is currently orbiting the Earth aboard the International Space Station (ISS), where he has been since August of this year.

Kirobo was designed and built during a collaboration between an advertising company called Dentsu, the University of Tokyo and car manufacturers Toyota. He was designed as a companion for Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata, who is perhaps best known as the first Japanese person to command the ISS.

Kirobo’s creators hope that the diminutive robot will provide emotional support to Wakata, providing interesting sociological data regarding whether robotic companions can comfort individuals who are subjected to long periods of isolation.

Kirobo has been specially designed to navigate zero gravity environments, he can also speak and understand spoken commands. In fact, Kirobo has many of the same properties as a smartphone in that he can record video and make (very) long distance calls (although his high score on ‘Juice Cubes’ is not yet a matter of public record). Kirobo’s facial recognition software means that he can recognise and react to certain individuals (presumably empathizing with their moods).

In addition to being a cutting edge piece of technology, Kirobo also appears to be of a friendly disposition, the little guy has already called us from space, saying, “My dream is to see human beings and robots live together as friends,”
Kirobo also reportedly requested Wakata’s presence at the station, saying “I really want to see you soon”, he’ll be waiting a long time, however, as Wakata is not due at the ISS for about eleven months.

Wireless Headsets for Voice Recognition

While many of our visitors are excited about some of my own posts, here is one i found looking around edu blogs it’s much better written than I might ever dream to reach. Maybe at some point I’ll get to their rank, you never know.

audioOverviewVoice recognition is the process of using technology to convert your spoken words into text. This process has been adopted by many specialist disciplines – lawyers, doctors, pathologists, etc. In fact, voice recognition can provide huge productivity gains to anyone who needs to dictate reports whilst using their hands for purposes other than typing.
Over the past few years voice recognition converts have been seeking a wireless headset that provides excellent voice quality input to recognition software. During this period my company, AAAHeadsets, have been actively involved in helping customers achieve this outcome.
The ProblemIn 1998 one customer undertook an extensive assessment of a range of headsets (both corded and wireless) over an eight week period. He determined that the Plantronics CS60-USB gave the best results. However, while acceptable, the results were not optimal. Staff still had to find and correct a number of misinterpretations made by their software package.
Any user of Dragon Dictate or similar voice recognition product knows that every % improvement in speech recognition means more productivity. The difference between a 96% recognition rate and a 99% recognition rate is finding and correcting 15 words instead of 5 in a 500 word document. Error correction kills productivity, so every error eliminated is valuable time saved.
See all 2 photos Plantronic CS60-USB Wireless HeadsetSource: AAAHeadsets The SolutionThe Plantronics CS60-USB wireless headset was the best available solution for some time. Then Sennheiser released their DW Office headset. This headset provided a leap in voice recognition results. For a number of years Sennheiser had been recognised as having the best noise cancelling headset microphones. Now they also had the best interface to voice recognition software. But there were still recognition errors.
Sennheiser have recently launched their DW Pro 1 (single ear) and DW Pro 2 (two ear) wireless headsets and these have created a new standard in speech recognition. Previous users of the DW Office have reported reductions in recognition errors of about 15%.
The DW Pro1 and DW Pro2 enable you to improve your speech recognition rate while enjoying the freedom to move around without being tethered to your computer. This freedom supports creative thought and writing which is important when trying to convert complex thoughts to meaningful words.
See all 2 photos Sennheiser DW Pro1 Wireless HeadsetSource: AAAHeadsets The Impact of NoiseBackground noise is also an important environmental factor when using a speech recognition package. Your headset microphone will pick up any environmental noise (machinery, other voices, computers, etc) and add it to your voice before presenting it to your voice recognition software. This makes it very hard for the package to interpret your words correctly.
The Sennheiser DW Pro1 & 2 have ultra noise-cancelling microphones which successfully filter out unwanted background noise. In fact, in my opinion, Sennheiser has the most effective noise cancelling microphones on the market. That is why noisy schools and doctors waiting rooms choose Sennheiser DW headsets.
Sennheiser DW Pro1 Headset Lifestyle Source: Sennheiser Communications ConclusionVoice recognition software packages perform two primary functions:

converting your voice into text for report production, and

controlling your computing environment (i.e. computer and software functionality).
Correcting words in reports is time consuming. However, losing control of your computer programs through poor recognition is scary. Put a value on your time and invest in a Sennheiser Pro headset to optimize your speech recognition system.
Experienced voice recognition users, with a Sennheiser Pro headset, estimate that their keyboard usage has been reduced by around 95%. Would you be happy with 95% less keyboard usage ?
Experienced voice recognition users, dictating complex reports using a Sennheiser Pro headset, are achieving such a high level of recognition that they find it difficult without their headset.
What are you waiting for? Improve productivity, get a Sennheiser Pro wireless headset today.

Where to Buy Bluetooth Headset

With a huge amount of information around the web about radio earpiece’s it’s hard to discover the top and largely candid information. here’s a piece of writing from a good blog that i believe as accurate, don’t quote me on it but please read and enjoy

headset. earphonesBluetooth is an excellent communication tool that allows you to use your Bluetooth-enabled devices without using any wires.
If you want to buy a Bluetooth headset, you can buy it from a number of places. However, you are strongly advised to first carry out sufficient research about the type and model of Bluetooth headset that you are willing to buy.

Buy a Bluetooth Wireless Headset Online
Internet has become a commonplace when it comes to but any type of stuff such as from advanced technology tools to homemade stuff, you can buy almost everything on the Internet. Likewise, there is a plethora of online web stores that allow you to buy your choice of Bluetooth wireless headset at reasonable price.

Before you use these sources to buy a headset, you should find out the reliability of your selected online web stores. You should check their privacy policy, business and return policies to confirm that you are going to buy your headset from a reliable place. Another important thing that you should check before buying a headset from any online web store is the shipment specifications of your selected web store.

There are many good online stores that are offering a good variety of headsets for Bluetooth-enabled devices at affordable rates. All you have to do to make online purchase is to select a reliable web store that is offering a secured online shopping option and then select the Bluetooth headset that you want to buy.
You can pay either online via your credit card or some web stores allow you to pay on delivery. In addition, you can check the complete details of your selected Bluetooth headset on the web store that you are using to buy that particular headset.

Buy a Bluetooth Headset from a Local Store
Another easy way to buy a Bluetooth headset is to visit the local shops that are offering a good variety of Bluetooth wireless headsets. You can visit many shops that are located in your area in order to find the best deal. Moreover, you can test your chosen headset on the spot before making a final purchase that will help you make the best purchase.

Purchase a Headset Directly from the Manufacturer
Another easy to purchase a Bluetooth headset is to contact the manufacturer directly. There are many big electronic brands that are selling their Bluetooth wireless headsets directly to their customers through their official franchise. You can contact your favorite manufacturer and you can get the complete details of your selected headset before buying it.

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Plantronics Headsets Make Communication Easier

A keen enthusiast, with a lifelong passion for all types of Radio Accessory. Editor and publisher of Motorola Earpiece.com – a comprehensive Earpiece guidebook to techniques, gear and testimonials.

The world of technology and communication is stepping ahead at a rapid speed. In the start, the traditional telephones made distances disappear. The invention of cordless telephones made communication even easier. And then, cell phones gave a whole new look to the communication world. But now is the era of headsets.

One just needs a cell phone to dial numbers; headset takes care of the rest. Plantronics cell phone headsets are very stylish headsets which have an on/off LED indicator, a volume/mute button and a call control button. The Plantronics cell phone headsets are wireless and are connected via Bluetooth. The point of difference of Plantronics Bluetooth headsets are their exclusive executive designs. These Plantronics Bluetooth headsets are sleek and extremely stylish.

The main aim of designing Plantronics headsets in such a stylish way is to provide comfort with style. So the company does not only take care of the customer’s comfort but also of the overall design of their products. Similarly the black and grey Plantronics computer headsets are perfect headsets for pc gamers and people who use pc telephones. The sound quality of the Plantronics gaming headsets is extraordinary and they are designed keeping teenagers’ choices in mind, thus their design is exactly what teenagers and pc gamers demand for. The Plantronics gaming headsets are available in a number of styles and colors.

Employees working at call centres and offices usually need headphones which are comfortable so that they can be used continuously for hours without creating discomfort, so Plantronics computer headsets takes care of their needs.  Another outstanding accessory for such employees is the Plantronics noise cancelling headsets, especially for people who need to take orders or make deals via telephone. Plantronics noise cancelling headsets provide an excellent sound quality and have the feature of voice clarity which enables user to have an extraordinary experience.

There are two types of Plantronics office headsets available. One of them is corded and the others are wireless. The office headsets are designed in a way that they are easy to use, very comfortable, stylish, and their quality is unmatchable. Plantronics office headsets make it easy for the employees to sit back and enjoy a cup of coffee while they finalise their deals over the phone. On the other hand, some mobile phones, traditional telephones and pc-telephones do not have the option of Bluetooth, for such telephones, Plantronics Corded headsets serve the purpose.

The 3.5mm plug enables the Plantronics corded headsets to attach with any PC sound card, cell phone or traditional telephone. Thus it can be concluded that Plantronics headsets are widely used all over the world because of their top sound quality and their sleek stylish design. The best thing about Plantronics headsets is that there is a different category of headset for different types of users. Thus the wide range of Plantronics products allow us to choose the type of headset we require and which exactly matches our needs.

 Company provides best Plantronics headsets to its clients worldwide cost effectively.