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Monthly Archives: August 2014

Walkie Talkies – The Old Ways To Communicate Can Still Be The Best

headphonesWhat would you do if i stated I have found a radio accessory short article that is not only interesting but informative also? I knew you wouldn’t believe me, so here it is the informative, excellent and fascinating editorial

Walkie Talkies are portable communication devices consisting of low-level radio transmitters and receivers.

Walkie talkies are often pictured as that black bulgy transistor with a big antenna that one has to hold near his mouth before he speaks.
However, design and technology has really changed the look and feel of Walkie Talkies. In addition, they are just an amazing toy for kids, it lets them have a lot of fun while playing around and communicating at the same time.
Walkie Talkies – A Little History

The first walkie-talkies were developed for military use during World War II, and spread to public safety and eventually commercial and job site work after the war. Typical walkie-talkies resemble a telephone handset, possibly slightly larger but still a single unit, with an antenna sticking out of the top.
Early Handie-Talkies had tubes and ran on 4, 45-volt dry cells or 12V Nickel-Cadmium batteries. Surplus Motorola Handie Talkies found their way into the hands of ham radio operators immediately following World War II. Walkie-talkies are widely used in any setting where portable radio communications are necessary, including business, public safety, outdoor recreation, and the like, and devices are available at numerous price points.

Walkie-talkies, thanks to increasing use of miniaturized electronics, can be made very small, with some personal two-way UHF radio models being smaller than a pack of cigarettes (though VHF and HF units can be substantially larger due to the need for larger antennas and battery packs).

The lowest cost devices are very simple electronically (single-frequency, crystal-controlled, generally based on a simple discrete transistor circuit where “grownup” walkie-talkies use chips), may employ super regenerative receivers. They may lack even a volume control, but they may nevertheless be elaborately designed, often superficially resembling more “grown-up” radios such as FRS or public safety gear.

An unusual feature, common on children’s walkie-talkies but seldom available otherwise even on amateur models, is a “code key”, that is, a button allowing the operator to transmit Morse code or similar tones to another walkie-talkie operating on the same frequency.

Motorola
The first radio receiver/transmitter to be nick-named “Walkie-Talkie” was the backpacked Motorola SCR-300, created by an engineering team in 1940 at the Galvin Manufacturing Company (fore-runner of Motorola). Handie-Talkie became a trademark of Motorola, Inc.

The abbreviation HT, derived from Motorola’s “Handie Talkie” trademark, is commonly used to refer to portable hand held ham radios, with “walkie-talkie” used to designate more specialized commercial and personal radios. Motorola also produced the hand-held AM SCR-536 radio during World War II, and it was called the “Handie-Talkie” (HT).

Motorola’s public safety radios of the 1950s and 1960s, were loaned or donated to ham groups as part of the Civil Defence program. Motorola is forever introducing new models, so don’t get bogged down looking for any particular model, since the model numbers change frequently.

Today, GMRS radios such as Motorola’s T5950 can reach several miles.
Product
While FRS walkie-talkies are also sometimes used as toys because mass-production makes them low cost, they have proper super heterodyne receivers and are a useful communication tool for both business and personal use. Motorola has a huge chunk of the market and consistently receive high marks from consumer products testing groups.

Kids
Your kids will get as much of a kick out of it as we did as children. Another difference from cell phones is that there’s no air time charge (at all, ever), so you can give one to your kids without worrying. The kids loved having them around since it gives them more independence and freedom, especially on out door trips and camping.

Walkie Talkies are a fun way to communicate with your friends and is a pretty good deal considering how cheap they are. Whether you are on the slopes, hiking or simply mucking around in your own house or garden, Walkie Talkies are an absolute must.

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Cell Phones With Music-T-Mobile

While many of our visitors might be interested by some of our own content pieces, here’s one i discovered whilst looking around wordpress that is far better written than I could ever dream to reach. Maybe one day I’ll get to their level, you never know.

With all the new makes and models of cell phones that are available today, you may be confused as to which model would best suit your needs. If you are interested in a model that will enable you to listen to music and your service provider is T-Mobile, there are several cell phones that you may want to check into.

One of these models is the Motorola KRZR that has a built-in music player that plays both MP3 and ACC formats. Its Bluetooth Wireless Technology supports Streaming Stereo Music as well as Streaming Headset. It has an expandable MicroSD memory port as well as a 128MB MicroSD memory card which T-Mobile includes. By adding software that you can purchase separately, you can synchronize your cell phone with your PC, enabling you to download your favorite music straight from your computer into the palm of your hand. An ear bud and a USB cable are included with the KRZR.

The T-Mobile Dash is another cell phone model that is offered by T-Mobile that allows you to listen to your favorite songs any where you go. This type has a MP3 player as well as WMA support. Playlists are also supported with this model. It contains Bluetooth Wireless Technology, Stereo Support, and Stereo Headset Support. It also has Streaming Multimedia Support that allows you to download onto a MS Windows Media Player 10 that plays both video and music files by using a CD-ROM with MS ActiveSync which is included. T-Mobile also includes a USB cable and an ear bud with this cell phone.

Another cell phone that has music capabilities that is offered by T-Mobile is the T-Mobile Wing. This device has Bluetooth Streaming Multimedia Support that enables you to download onto a Windows Media Player that supports MP3 playlists, WMA, Album Art, Shuffle, and DRM. It also has Bluetooth Headset support as well as a stereo headset that is included. You can synchronize this cell phone with your PC with a USB cable as well as CD-ROM Software, both of which are also included with this model.

The Nokia 5300 XpressMusic is also offered by T-Mobile. Bluetooth Streaming Music supports a MP3 player as well as a FM radio that gives you the ability to preset channels. As this radio uses a headset as an antenna, T-Mobile has included this item along with the phone. You can also use the headset normally thanks to Bluetooth Stereo Headset Support. PC synchronization is also possible with Nokia PC Suite Software which is available for free. This phone also comes with a 1GB memory card and a USB cable.

Another model of cell phone that has music capabilities is the Motorola RIZR Z3. This type has a built-in MP3 player that also supports AAC formats. Bluetooth Wireless Technology supports Streaming Stereo Sound as well as Stereo Headset. An ear bud is included with this model.

These are just a few of the many styles and models of cellular phones that are offered by T-Mobile. To look at its entire line, you can visit your local T-Mobile office or visit its numerous Web sites.

Two Way Radios – How to Choose The Best Walkie-Talkie for Your Business Needs

So to carry on my run of content pieces on this website, I’ve planned to share one of my favourite content pieces this week. I was cautious to add it to the blog because I actually didn’t want to offend the initial writer, but I hope he/she is glad that I loved reading their article and wanted to share it with my readers.

audioTwo way radios can add thousands of dollars to your bottom line in the first year by saving as much as 5-9% of labor time.
Make absolutely sure you select the right radio for your needs the first time.
Walkie-Talkies were introduced into typical business practices decades ago. Technology and battery engineering made them cumbersome and difficult to use in everyday applications. However, 2-way radios were recently made super-affordable, more portable and were given a much improved battery life.

Combine these advancements with the ability to save countless labor-hours, cost-free talk time and you have one of the most promising bottom-line tools for just about any business.
The key to getting the most out of your two-way radios is to make absolutely certain you choose the correct model the first time you buy your radios. Many small businesses make the mistake by starting off using Family-FRS radios. Typically, these will work out great for the first month.

Invariably however, these radios will begin to lose the battery charge, the clips will break off, the speakers will cease to function after a few drops, and the entire radio will need to be replaced within a relatively short period of time. These FRS radios were simply not designed for regular, daily use.
They were manufactured almost as toys, and are meant to be used gently a few times per year. Further, according to FCC guidelines, it is a violation to use FRS radios in a business function.

The proper two-way radio makes all the difference in the world. For the most part, any small to upper-medium sized company can benefit from the use of today’s walkie talkies. The cost will typically range from $120 per radio to about $300 each. Improvements in battery design will get a full day use after an overnight charge for as much as 2-3 years of daily use.
Plus, the durability of the radios has improved so much that it is not unheard of for some radios to still work great after 10 years.

There are four basic elements to consider in choosing the right radio for your job:
VHF vs. UHF – The difference between UHF and VHF can be explained with frequency penetration. VHF waves travel about twice the distance of UHF waves on open ground, rolling hills or through foliage. However, VHF waves are very poor at penetrating walls, buildings and rugged terrain.
So, if you are working exclusively outdoors with open land, rolling hills or heavy trees, VHF radios are the best. In any other situation, including indoor to outdoor use, UHF radios will be the choice. UHF and VHF radios will not communicate with each other.

Power – If the radios will be used within a single building, or outdoors in less than about 1 mile, then a 1-watt radio will be sufficient. If the 2-way radios will be used to communicate between multiple buildings or for up to 2 miles, then a 2-watt radio should be used.
There are 4 and 5 watt radios that will communicate consistently at further distances, but there is a limitation to any radio-to-radio communication. Once exceeded, the only way to proceed is through the use of a repeater.

Channels – If your entire group will always be speaking on the same channel at the same time, o matter how many radios you have, you will only need a 1-channel radio. However if you manage, say, a restaurant and you want the valets to be on one channel and the wait-staff to be on another channel, then you will want a 2-channel capable radio system.
This will allow each group to communicate individually, but not talk over each other. For you, as the manager, to be able to communicate with both of the groups you will want a radio that “scans”. This will allow you to speak with either group by switching to the appropriate channel automatically.

Durability – Business radios range anywhere form units that are designed for restaurant and hotel use, to radios for heavy-duty military operations. Review the specifications on each unit to determine the best fit for your needs.
By selecting the proper elements in choosing your initial radios, you will be assured of starting off on the right foot communication-wise. You will gain all of the benefits of having two-way radio communication, but will avoid the common pitfall of having to replace old radios that will not work with what should have been used in the first place.

Urbanears Kransen

So i found this short article on the internet and i was told that just posting it as the whole article isn’t a good thing, I got permission from the original author and read up how to curate content, so that is it…….i thought this was fascinating because it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working inside the industry.

The era of cheap earphones sounding like garbage has swiftly become history. It’s now possible to recommend pairs around $50 or less now, when a few years ago I cringed at the thought. The Urbanears Kransen, at $39 (direct), is an in-ear pair with a smart, simple design and gobs of bass response. Typically, you’d expect earphones in this price range to either have no real bass or to distort the bass like crazy, but the Kransen brings the low frequency response and manages to avoid distortion. Purists seeking a flat-response or crisp sound signature should look elsewhere, though; this is an option for bass lovers, balanced out with just enough high-mid presence so that things don’t sound muddy. The Kransen doesn’t quite edge out the Editors’ Choice JLab Fit$29.99 at Amazon, but it’s a solid set at a good price.

Available in ten colors, the Kransen’s$40.00 at REI look is modern and simple. The plastic on the earpieces is a matte surface that matches the cable’s color, and the only deviation from the uniform color scheme is a small metallic panel on the inside of the earpiece (and hidden from view when the Kransens are in your ears) that has the logo and “L” or “R” etched into it. The fit is lightweight and secure.

An inline remote control and mic are located along the left ear’s cable at about chin level, and at about mid-chest the rubberized cables join into one cloth-lined cord. The single-button remote can play/pause music, answer calls, or skip tracks with multiple button taps, but it offers no way to adjust the volume. The Kransen is light on accessories, only shipping with three total pairs of eartips and no carrying pouch. At the bargain price of $40, however, a lot of accessories shouldn’t be expected.

Urbanears Kransen inlineThe Kransen is armed with some clever design aimed at helping you keep your earphones tangle-free when stowed in your bag. The two earpieces snap together when not in use, and the rubber area at the end of the cable has a hole that the 3.5mm connection can slide into after you’ve looped the cable, acting as a sort of twist-tie and keeping the cable from tangling.

My only fear here, and this is not something I can test in my relatively short time with the product, is that the cabling inside could snap. The connection point of the cables to the earpieces and the cable’s end are the two most likely places for a cable to break, meaning you’ll need to get a new pair of earphones. Adding pressure to the end, as using this loop feature does, makes me pretty nervous about the longevity of the Kransenbut you can always choose to not use this feature, and there’s no way of being certain that my fears are warranted.

Performance
On tracks with serious sub-bass content, like the Knife’s “Silent Shout,” the Kransen does not distort even at top (and unsafe) listening levels. These earphones also manage to push out a heavy dose of powerful low-end, impressive in this price range. The secure in-ear fit may help the bass response seem a bit more powerful than it is, but the drivers are still well-equipped to deliver deep lows. At more moderate listening levels, the sense of big bass is still quite present,

On Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” his baritone vocals are given a bit of added low-end richness (which they hardly need), and the drums get an extra dose of low-end, too. This often kills the mix on bass-boosted earphones, but the Kransen combines the healthy lows with enough high-mid and high frequency presence to balance things out. Without a doubt, this is still a bass-lover’s earphone pair and not for anyone seeking a particularly crisp or flat-response sound, but it doesn’t eliminate the high-mids and highs to the extent that things sound muddy.

Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild,” which features some hefty sub-bass synth hits that punctuate the beat, comes off as another bass-forward affair. Those synth hits are delivered with almost subwoofer-like force, but the attack of the kick drum loop here misses its sharp edge that helps it slice through the beat. The vocals stay out in the forefront of this dense mix nonetheless, and the song remains balanced enough so that bass lovers can still hear the other aspects besides the bass.

Classical tracks like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances” actually sound excellent on the Kransen. The bass boost lent to the lower register strings gives things a nice round sound, while the higher register strings and percussion already possess a natural advantage over the rest of the orchestra, so they’re less affected by the dialed-back high-mids and highs of the earphones. Again, purists won’t love this sound, but the Kransen delivers a nice balance of rich bass response with at least some crispness in the high-mids here that it can’t seem to attain on mixes from other genres.

If you’re looking for the big bass experience and have a bit more money to spend, the in-ear SOL Republic Relays$79.99 at Verizon Wireless delivers powerful lows and balances them, somewhat, with the rest of the frequency range. If you’re after a more balanced sound overall, with less booming bass response, the TDK EB95022.49 at Amazon and Sennheiser CX 685 SPORTS$60.47 at Amazon both offer a solid, balanced listening experience. And if you wish to go even cheaper than the Kransen’s budget price, the Editors’ Choice JLab Fit offers solid audio and more accessories. For $40, however, the good-looking Urbanears Kransen is a worthy option that delivers distortion-free, thunderous low-end for the budget-minded bass lover.

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DP 3400/3401 Non-display Portable Radios

With a lot information on the net about radio accessory’s it’s hard to find the top and largely truthful articles. here’s a piece from a good website that i believe to be true, don’t quote me on it but please read and enjoy

headphonesTri-color LED indicator for clear, visible feedback of calling, scanning and monitoring.

Emergency button to alert supervisor or dispatcher in an emergency situation.

New accessory connector meets IP57 submersibility specifications and incorporates RF, USB and enhanced audio capability.

DP 3401 includes integrated GPS module.

Radio housing meets IP57 specifications; submersible in 1 metre of water up to
30 minutes.

Powerful, front projecting speaker.

Three side programmable buttons for easy access to favourite features. New

features such as one-touch calling and quick text messaging are made even easier through programmable button access.

Large, textured push-to-talk button. Provides good tactile response and easy access, even when wearing gloves.

32 channels

Non-display Portable Radio

Standard Package

• Non-display Portable Radio

• Antenna – Standard whip included with DP

3400; GPS Monopole included with DP 3401

• NiMH 1300 mAh Battery

• IMPRES™ Single Unit Charger

• 2.5” Belt Clip

• Quick Reference Guide

Additional Features

• Enhanced call management

Encode: emergency, push-to-talk ID Decode: radio check, remote monitor, radio disable, all call

• Dual-mode analogue/digital scan – facilitates a smooth migration from analogue to digital

• Send quick text messaging via programmable buttons

• DP 3401 can transmit GPS coordinates

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Divoom Bluetune Bean

This short article is posted by the strict permission of earphone.com, that is the original website. please get consent from that website before reposting this article.

At $29.99 (direct), it would be ridiculous to have great expectations for the Divoom Bluetune Bean portable Bluetooth speaker. Basically, as long as it turns on, pairs, and emits some form of listenable audio, it’s doing its job. On tracks that don’t have deep bass, it does indeed deliver decent, if very treble-heavy, audio. On tracks with beefy bass parts, it distorts big-time when we venture higher than moderate volume levels, but this is to be expected from such a low-priced speaker. The built-in speakerphone functionality is a plus, and the easily portable, wearable design make the Bean a solid outdoor companion for the budget-minded.

Design
Offered in red, black, white or pastel blue, yellow, or pink, the oval-shaped Bean sits flat on a countertop and projects sound upward through its speaker grille. The 3.6-by-1.7-by-2.7-inch (HWD) speaker is lightweight (3.7 ounces) and made for easy portabilitythe included carabiner attaches to its metallic loop. While the Bean is not waterproof, its rubberized shell is ideal for outdoor use. Divoom Bluetune Bean inline

Along the left-side panel, there’s a Power button and a Telephone button, and in between them a minuscule status LED. The Power button doubles as the Bluetooth pairing button, and the pairing process was straightforward and quick with our iPhone 5s. A USB charging cable is included, and connects to a covered port along the edge of the device. There’s no volume control on the speaker, so you’ll need to control everything on your Bluetooth paired device itself.

Charging time is roughly 2 hours, and Divoom estimates a battery life of approximately 6 hours per full charge.

Performance
As one might predict upon first glance, the Bean is a distortion factory on tracks with serious sub-bass content, like The Knife’s “Silent Shout.” The distortion creeps in at moderate volumes, and at high volumes completely overtakes the speakerbut this is what we’d expect from a tiny, $30 device.

On tracks without booming low-end, like Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” there’s no distortion, even at top volumes, and we get a clear idea of the Bean’s sound signature: It’s almost all treble. This can be good in a certain sense, as the vocals are always crisp through the Bean, and guitar strumming has a nice edge to it, but the mids and lows are almost nowhere to be foundeven much of the baritone of Callahan’s vocals seems M.I.A. Classical tracks are all treble as wellI could hardly make out the lower register strings when playing John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances.”

Basically, the Bean doesn’t really offer you a great sonic experienceit offers you the ability to take your music with you and listen to it outdoors. The speaker also tends to chop off the very first second of each track that you navigate toa common issue with cheaper Bluetooth speakers. And if you place your phone too close to the speaker, you can get some static/GSM interference strong enough to compete with the music. This was common years ago, but most speakers these days do a far better job of shielding themselves from this type of interference.

The Bean is fine for what it isat $30, you’re not going to get much in the way of solid audio performance. If you need to stay in this price range, the 808 Audio Canz Wireless Speaker offers a slightly fuller sound, but neither speaker is going to knock your socks off. For better Bluetooth audio, you need to spend more moneyconsider the Panasonic SC-NT10 or the Skullcandy Air Raidneither of these is flawless either, as they are more or less budget options, as well, but they bring a little more power to the table. If you have plenty of room in your budget, the Bose SoundLink Mini will not disappoint. The Divoom Bluetune Bean, at $30, is more tool than speakeranswer your calls, listen to audio at a higher volume than your phone or small laptop can muster, but don’t expect greatness.

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TECH NEWS Electric Buses Set to Arrive on Time!

Article of the Day………ok so i don’t have an article every day, but when i get an opportunity I will post content that I find interesting. Lucky enough here’s one of these articles that I read and had to share. If you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of those special social media likes, you know the one that tells one and all that you loved something, rather than you sat on your arse and watched Television!

Eight experimental electric buses will be operating in Milton Keynes from late January onwards. The fleet will begin operating along the busy Number 7 route, which covers the 15 miles between Wolverton and Bletchley. They are the first electric buses to operate in the UK.

UK-based bus manufacturer Wrightbus have built these new electric buses in conjunction with Japanese company Mitsui and UK engineering group Arup.

Wireless ‘booster’ plates in the road, placed at the beginning/end of the route, give the buses a charge that allows them to operate for a full day. They are then charged overnight at the bus depot.

The buses will need to stop over the booster plates, before lowering the bus’ own receiver plates and resting there for 10 minutes’ charge time. The journey will then resume, exactly the same way a regular bus ride does.

The process is called ‘inductive charging’ and it involves electricity passing though wire coils in the plates that creates a magnetic field. The field then shares its voltage with the bus’ receiver plates, charging them up.

Similar electric bus trials are being implemented in Italy, the Netherlands and Germany. In 2013, South Korea unveiled a 7.5-mile stretch of road, which recharges electric vehicles as they drive over it, without requiring any charge time at all.

In an interview with the BBC, John Bint of Milton Keynes Council said, “Electric buses have huge potential and we’re exploring how they can help us take better care of the environment without compromising passenger service,”

If these trial models prove to be successful, the Council plans to run them all across the town.

The environmental impact of this scheme is certainly considerable, with local councils potentially being able to significantly reduce their area’s carbon footprint. In addition, the future development of electric buses can only help the similar evolution of the electric car, an invention that has the potential to seriously lower the world’s carbon emissions.

Arup consultant John Miles who is also an engineering professor at Cambridge University, told BBC that, “These electric buses will be expected to do everything a diesel bus does (…) They will be operating on a demanding urban route, and that’s all part of the trial’s aim – to prove that electric buses can be tough as well as green.”