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Monthly Archives: March 1986

Using Pee to recharge your tablets, can it be possible

audioThis blog is amazing! i never thought that this could make it as site….hope all enjoys it

Scientists working at the University West of England (UWE) in Bristol, United kingdom, have found out a way to power a mobile phone with Human urine.

The company have been able to charge a Samsung phone by putting the fluid through a surge of microbial fuel cells. With this process, enough power has been produced to send text messages, browse the Web and also make a quick telephone call.

Based on the scientists in charge, the next step is to completely recharge the device with urine…Presumably washing their hands directly afterwards.

Dr. Ioannis Ieropoulos has labored for ages with microbial fuel cells; he’s considered to be a guru in harnessing energy from abnormal options. The potential purposes of his work are very attractive from an environmental point of view.

Dr. Ieropoulos said, “We’re very excited as this is the world’s first, no-one has harnessed energy from pee to try this so it’s an interesting discovery. Using the ultimate waste product as the source of power to produce electricity is about as eco as it gets.” Eco-friendly tech is, obviously, the great doctor’s main area of interest.

The microbial cells work as a energy converter, they take the natural matter straight into electrical energy, via the metabolism of live microorganisms. The electrical power is the by-product of the microorganism’s natural life cycle, meaning that as they ‘eat’ the urine, they produce power the energy that powers the phone. Now that is what we call ‘pee as you go’.

Toilet humour aside, the team have engineered a world first, as nothing as large as a phone battery has ever been charged using this method before.

You’ll notice, at the present, no plans to promote this tech on a large scale, but maybe someday we can be signing a ‘P’ mobile contract, the trick, as they are saying, might be pissistance.

PS – I’m sorry about this one. The work and its implications are astonishing. All credit to the UWE team. Though, I constantly wanted to do one of those ‘And Finally’ type tales and now I conclusively get to. Please forgive me, one and all.

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Riveting, Nimble & Elegant Thriller ‘Grand Piano’ Starring Elijah Wood & John Cusack

With a lot information around the net about radio accessory’s its hard to find the top and most candid information. here is a piece of writing from a reputable website that i believe to be true, do not quote me on it but please read and enjoy

earpieceA welcome reminder that high-concept thrillers neednt rely on stupid coincidences and even stupider characters in order to succeed, Grand Piano turns the unlikeliest of scenarios into a riveting battle of wills. The story of a concert pianist whose comeback performance gets hijacked by a sniper with a secret agenda, director Eugenio Miras latest film breathlessly combines artistic anxiety and personal desperation, providing its character with a journey as intense emotionally as it is physically. In fact, probably the best Brian De Palma movie he never made, Grand Piano expands the boundaries of single-location, real-time mysteries like Phone Booth and Panic Room with a brilliantly simple concept and nimble, elegant style.

Elijah Wood plays Tom Selznick, a master-class pianist set to play in public for the first time in five years. Having famously choked during a performance of a piece by his late mentor, he is understandably nervous about his return to the stage. But shortly after he begins playing, he discovers that someone has marked up his sheet music with threats to murder him and his wife Emma (Kerry Bish) unless he performs flawlessly. Receiving an earpiece that allows his would-be puppetmaster (John Cusack) to communicate with him, he’s confronted with a challenge that has multiple repercussionsnamely, in delivering a performance that not only saves his career, but his very life.

As loath as I am to describe the music in the film as another character, the concerto written by Victor Reyes is absolutely essential, providing a (no pun intended) meticulously orchestrated through line that frames and enhances each new development in the story even as it serves as a ubiquitous reminder of Selznicks past failures. That it occasionally allows him to depart the stage mid-performance constitutes great planning on Miras part, but the fact that it provides a parallel line for Selznicks emotional state as he embarks on this unexpected rollercoaster is truly masterful. There are few modern examples of music being truly integrated into storytelling, certainly as well as this film does, and even without an appreciation for classical composition, theres much to admire about its use and effectiveness.

As the man behind the keys, Wood carries the film, finding a believable and compelling arc for a character whose default setting might in lesser hands be desperation. Selznicks paralyzing fears of choking a second time are echoed repeatedly in dialogue in opening scenes, first during a particularly contentious phone interview commemorating the performance, then from virtually everyone he encountershes not allowed to forget how grandly he flopped five years prior, even if he could manage to forgive himself. But through Wood, the character convincingly evolves over the course of the film, initially aiming for perfection out of fear, and then slowly building his confidence as he begins to devise a way to turn the tables on his unseen adversary.

Wood is an ideal casting choice for a role like thishandsome and obviously gifted, but overshadowed physically by the actress who plays his more-successful movie star wifeand he turns an otherwise self-contained journey into an opportunity for personal empowerment and professional redemption. Meanwhile, Cusack has less to do physically as the voice on the other end of Selznicks earpiece, but he nevertheless communicates a palpable sense of danger that his victim is right to take seriously. Together, they create a psychological duel worthy of the films theatrical pitch, cementing its intensity as the final, crucial notes of Selznicks performance rapidly approach.

Serving as more than a welcome contrast to the handheld, improvisational camerawork of too many other movies these days, Miras direction is a marvel of fluidity and poetry. The careful composition of each shot enhances the films melodramatic sweep without distracting from the story and performances; whether simply taking inspiration or outright stealing pages from (classic) De Palmas playbook, Mira distinguishes his film with a classical, muscular visual style that suits its high-society backdrop, and mirrors Selznicks mental scramble to focus on his performance and his potential murder at the same time.

Although hes occasionally distracted by expository or plot-lengthening devices such as the snipers accomplice and Selznick’s wifes obnoxiously self-involved friend, Mira makes a breakthrough here as a storyteller and visual stylist that should pay great dividends, regardless of whether or not he chooses to migrate from Spain to Hollywood. But regardless of his own future, Mira makes Selznicks comeback a remarkably immediate experience by dropping the audience into the middle of his implausible, heightened concept and then enabling them to identify with the characters anguish. Ultimately an expertly timed, painstakingly assembled and endlessly engaging game of cat and mouse, Grand Piano succeeds as a whole for the same reasons that Selznick doesnamely, because Mira brings all of its elements to work together in concert, and then executes them like a virtuoso.