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Monthly Archives: October 1984

Is Motorola Solutions Destined for Greatness?

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Investors love stocks that consistently beat the Street without getting ahead of their fundamentals and risking a meltdown. The best stocks offer sustainable market-beating gains, with robust and improving financial metrics that support strong price growth. DoesMotorola Solutions (NYSE: MSI ) fit the bill? Let’s take a look at what its recent results tell us about its potential for future gains.
What we’re looking for
The graphs you’re about to see tell Motorola’s story, and we’ll be grading the quality of that story in several ways:

• Growth: Are profits, margins, and free cash flow all increasing?
• Valuation: Is share price growing in line with earnings per share?
• Opportunities: Is return on equity increasing while debt to equity declines?
• Dividends: Are dividends consistently growing in a sustainable way?

How we got here and where we’re going
We first looked at Motorola last year, and it’s earned six out of nine possible passing grades in its second assessment, the same number it earned earlier. Free cash flow has fallen since last year, but the company’s dividend payouts have increased at a greater rate. These trends might indicate the loss of a passing grade or two next year if the company remains committed to dividend payouts despite declining free cash flow. Can Motorola improve its flagging revenue and turn around a weakened free cash flow position? Let’s dig a little deeper to see what Motorola might be up to for the coming year.
Over the past few quarters, Motorola has been struggling to push its revenue higher due to weakness in its government business, thanks in no small part to the U.S. sequester — the American government now accounts for about two-thirds of its overall revenues. My Foolish colleague Rich Smith points out that Motorola recently secured some smaller government contracts, despite unpleasant fiscal conditions in the U.S. The Department of Defense awarded the company a $16.9 million contract to offer land mobile radio support services in Kuwait.
However, this is not enough to move the needle — Motorola needs some billion-dollar contracts, or at least something in the nine figures. The problem is worse for Motorola than for fellow tech contractor Harris (NYSE: HRS ) , which seems to be picking up more government money to supply radios than its peer, in addition to its other telecommunications work. Motorola is almost entirely dependent on its radio sales today, and if Harris is outperforming it, there may not be much reason to expect growth ahead.
Fool contributor John Divine notes that Motorola’s enterprise solutions segment has also been quite slow to launch new products, which led to a substantial reduction in its full-year revenue forecast. According to Reuters, the release of Motorola’s Windows 8-based enterprise handhelds has been delayed until next year, which has weighed on the company’s enterprise segment. The launch of these new products should enable Motorola to win some of the deals that were deferred due to macroeconomic uncertainties this year, and that might finally improve its weak revenue position. Motorola’s RhoElements application framework is also expected to drive growth in enterprise-based applications, and its acquisition of Psionwill help it to expand globally and strengthen its mobile computing portfolio.
Motorola could also benefit from the increasing adoption of LTE mobile networks for public safety in the domestic and overseas markets. Last year, the government approved a payroll tax bill that allows the Federal Communications Commission to auction off TV spectrum for wireless services. The FCC later reallocated the D block spectrum for public safety purposes, which is right up Motorola’s radio-focused alley, provided it isn’t undermined by Harris or other contractors.
Putting the pieces together
Today, Motorola has some of the qualities that make up a great stock, but no stock is truly perfect. Digging deeper can help you uncover the answers you need to make a great buy — or to stay away from a stock that’s going nowhere.
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Source – http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/11/07/is-motorola-solutions-destined-for-greatness.aspx

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Why do Cops Still use Only Motorola Walkie-Talkies for Communication?

headset. earphonesYou are safe in the wisdom that I bring the best radio earpiece content pieces, several of them are my own several of which are curated by me, if i choose to use someone elses content it is because it’s important to my readership, so feel confident that you are reading the best from my industry.

OK, you said ‘cops’ which isn’t a word we generally use here in the UK. We Brits traditionally tend to refer, politely, to our ‘boys in blue’ as ‘bobbies’ or ‘the old bill’.

Anyway, given that, I’m going to assume that you’re asking about the American police and their longstanding partnership with the Motorola Corporation. OK, here goes…

According to Motorola’s official website,

“Law enforcement communications and police communications are essential assets to the safety and security initiatives in any community. Advancing police communications allow law enforcement to be more mobile and more rapidly respond to issues. Motorola offers an extensive product line to enhance law enforcement communications with less paperwork and faster, highly reliable performance”.

Motorola manufactured car radios as early as the 1920’s and US police and the fire brigade used a few of these, but it wasn’t until 1930 that the first police car radio was designed and built by Motorola. According to the official website,

“Sales of Motorola police radios began in November 1930. Among the first customers (all in the U.S. state of Illinois) were the Village of River Forest; Village of Bellwood Police Department; City of Evanston Police; Illinois State Highway Police; and Cook County Police in the Chicago area. As more police departments used radios, challenges emerged. Rough roads, engine noises, interference, high power consumption, and frequency instability led Paul Galvin to recognize that police departments needed a radio specifically engineered for patrol cars”.

In 1936, the Motorola Police Cruiser Radio was released. It was a success and Motorola have been a trusted brand by US Police ever since. In 1939, engineer Don Mitchell created the Mobile T6920 AM Transmitter. It was another success, becoming a logical choice for the police because,
“This complete Motorola two-way radio system was priced about one-fourth as much as the competition’s, and the transmitters could be installed in cars that already had receivers in the same frequency band. In 1940 the Police Department in Bowling Green, Kentucky, became the first customer for a complete Motorola AM two-way radio system. The radios were so well-designed that Galvin Manufacturing produced the same models for several years, until FM technology replaced them in the 1940s”.

Clearly, the US police have a long and fruitful relationship with the Motorola Company. This obviously applies to walkie-talkies as well. It makes good sense to employ a trusted, easy to use brand for successive generations of officers, who often have to respond swiftly and instinctively to various problems.
The first police to use two-way radios were actually Australian, but following the Second World War, mobile radios became standard issue in most first world countries.