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Monthly Archives: July 1981

JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort and Spa Saves Over $100K in Annual Cost and Increases.

Can’t get over how economical the radio accessory is, a tremendous deal for a top-end product!

With its newest resort opening its doors in early 2010, the JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort and Spa wanted to ensure that its new flagship property maintained and even exceeded its already high standards for guest satisfaction. Choosing MOTOTRBO over cellular push-to-talk technology, the hotel saved $14,000 per month in service fees, significantly improved response time to guest requests, and expects to achieve full return on investment within

18 months.

Situation: New flagship hotel property wanted to raise the bar in guest service

Located in the beautiful rolling countryside of Cibolo Canyons in south Texas, the JW Marriott San Antonio Hill Country Resort and Spa is one of Marriott International’s newest properties. Celebrating its grand opening in March 2010,
the resort offers over 1,000 rooms, a conference center with 140,000 square feet of meeting space, a six-acre water park, 700-acre preserve, and a 36-hole TPC golf course.

Maintaining the Marriott’s legendary high standards for guest satisfaction requires tools that increase efficiency and enable the resort’s service employees to respond quickly to guest requests. So when Brian Sherman, vice president of S&P Communications, a local Motorola channel partner, called on the resort to learn of their communications needs, Steve McGuire, director of engineering for the resort, was ready to listen.

“We were looking for new technology that would increase the efficiency of the hotel’s staff,” says McGuire. “We wanted the ability to call all employees with the push of a button, as well as the security of having our own system without having to rely on cell phones or paying monthly service fees. And we wanted radios that would integrate with the software and technology we are using.”
Improving the productivity benefits of CRM

The resort uses Guestware®, a Customer

Relationship Management (CRM) software solution designed specifically for the hospitality industry. But while the software improved the productivity of its maintenance and housekeeping staff, it was still dependent on manual data input via a computer.

For example, whenever a guest called with a request, the Front Desk logged into the application, opened a work ticket, then picked up the radio or telephone and called Housekeeping, Engineering or Maintenance. Upon reaching the right person they would assign the job, open the application and update the record. Once the job was complete the Front Desk then had to rely upon the individual to call back and report (which didn’t always happen) in order for the ticket to be closed out. McGuire wanted a two-way radio that would allow them not only to continue using Guestware, but to make that software even more efficient.

Solution: MOTOTRBO digital radio system with Capacity Plus

Sherman recommended MOTOTRBO digital portable radios with a six-channel Capacity Plus system.
The MOTOTRBO radios offer enhanced features, increased capacity, integrated data applications, exceptional voice quality and extended battery performance. With the addition of Capacity Plus, a scalable, single-site digital trunking solution, MOTOTRBO capacity would be expanded even further, enabling over a thousand radio users to share voice and data communication quickly and
efficiently on the same system without adding new frequencies.

Four voice repeaters and two data repeaters dedicated to the Guestware application were also installed, as well as the Teldio Radio Branch Exchange™ (RBX) application, a telephone-to-radio interface that would enable employees or guests

to use land-line telephones to connect directly with radio users. The system was deployed in stages beginning in November, 2009, with two digital
MOTOTRBO repeaters. Two more MOTOTRBO voice repeaters, two MOTOTRBO data revert repeaters and 10 application dependent control stations were installed in early January, 2010, utilizing CapacityPlus. The final implementation for Guestware and Teldio RBX radio-to-telephone interface was completed in April, 2010.

Results: The bottom line – flawless customer service

It takes more than good intentions to provide guests with the level of excellence expected from a high-end resort that has built its reputation on flawless customer service. The right processes must be in place to react quickly to guest requests and speed response to the issue. And the right tools must be available to allow employees to collaborate easily and get the job done unobtrusively and well.

Today all operations, including guest services, housekeeping, convention services, audio visual, food and beverage, recreation, engineering, and security communicate seamlessly via the MOTOTRBO
radio system. Nearly 100 percent of the hotel and grounds have full two-way radio coverage, including the convention center, which is located on a hillside where three of its floors are below ground level.

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Here one for you, why do People Hate the Sound of Their Own Voice When They Hear a Recording of it?

earpieceWith very little information on the internet about radio accessory’s, it is very rare when we get a chance to re post, with permission, an article from this industry.

Hi Jean-Paul,

This question reminds me of that episode of ‘Family Guy’ where Lois hears her voice on tape for the first time and unhappily remarks that she sounds “all whiny and nasal”, this is, of course, an in-joke for the fans watching at home, because Lois does actually sound like that. However, it is a feeling that most of us can relate to.

The sad truth is that, when you hear your voice on tape, you really do sound like that. Sure, the sound is slightly distorted by whatever microphone recorded it, but not to a great extent. You watch police car sirens on TV and then you hear them in real life and the difference isn’t huge, is it?

So, why is this?

Effectively, when you begin to speak aloud, you automatically trigger your pre-vocalization reflex, which is, effectively, a contraction of the muscles in your inner ear (particularly around your ossicles and your ear drum, which are two of the most important pieces for hearing). The end result is a tightening of the tympanic membrane, which dulls the sound of your own voice, causing the familiar, pleasing sound that you only think is the way your voice sounds to others.

So, you are hearing yourself without the dampening effect of the pre-vocalization reflex, which is unfamiliar to you.

The other reason that you may be inclined to hate the sound of your own voice when played back from a recording is probably psychological. Its only a pet theory of mine, but if the voice you hear is different to you and yet still recognizable as you, its a bit like getting an extreme new haircut when you aren’t prepared for it – its a challenge to self image. This actually causes a bit of a dilemma for the psyche, which is probably why it makes us so uncomfortable.

This may also go some way towards explaining that friend you have (everybody has one) who labours under the delusion that they can sing, when they actually have (to quote Billy Connolly) “a voice like a goose farting in the fog”.

Hope that helps, Jean-Paul, (it was a very good question, by the way), cheers!

How does bone conduction work? Asked by Mike from Nebraska, USA

Article of the Day………ok so i don’t have an article seven days a week, but when i get an opportunity I’ll post posts I find fascinating. Fortunate enough here’s one of those articles that I read and had to share. Should you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one that tells everyone you enjoyed something, rather then you sat on your arse and watched Television!

Hi Mike,

Bone conduction headphones (commonly referred to as ‘Bonephones’) are actually really clever. In order to best explain how they work, I’ll need to take you on a journey into the Human ear…

No, not literally. That would be disgusting.

OK, so you know how sound travels through the air? Surely you must have done that science experiment at school where you hear sound disappearing into an airless vacuum? Yup, it’s just like that.

Anyway, the sound waves come into contact with your outer ear structure, or pinna. Then, the sounds pass into your middle ear, which is filled with air (obviously). The sound travels through your auditory canal and then your eardrum. Your eardrum then vibrates, an action that passes the sound to your ossicles.

Now, the ossicles are three tiny little inner-ear bones and their job is to translate the sound to the cochlea, a fluid-filled structure that in turn ‘encodes’ the sounds in order for our brains to ‘decode’ and process them.

It’s actually quite a ride, when you think about it.

So, bone conduction headphones bypass the pinna, the auditory canal and the eardrum and take the vibrations directly to your ossicles, quite literally rattling your bones. From there, the ossicles transmit to the cochlea and the process carries on as usual.

That’s basically it.

It is actually a good way to listen to music if you have hearing problems and it has the added bonus of being effective whilst the listener has earplugs in, or even when he/she is underwater.

I had my doubts about the safety of this technology when it was first announced, but it has been out a while now and has been pronounced as safe by medical experts. In all probability, bone conduction is actually better for your ears than regular headphones are.

To quote, um, myself, in an article I published a few months ago:

“According to recent studies, exposure to any noise over 100 decibels wears away a membrane known as the myelin sheath and leaves your inner ear susceptible to problems like tinnitus and temporary deafness, which can be the beginning of even more serious problems. Bone conduction technology has been designed to bypass the most sensitive portions of your ear and reduce the risk of inner-ear damage”.