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Monthly Archives: July 1970

A Communication Situation: Analogue or Digital: Which is Best?

When we found this short article we were so excited, having searched for over a year for this, discovering it on this blog was an exciting day for yours truly.

Analogue and digital communications each have their supporters as well as their detractors. Each technology has its plus points as well as its drawbacks, but neither are hugely well understood by the average client. So here’s what we’re going to do; a handy little puff-piece detailing which type of two-way radio is best for your specific needs.

OK, so, first, let’s look at the differences between analogue and digital communications.

Analogue

Firstly, analogue technology translates information into radio waves in order to convey it over long distances. The more the wave may be compressed, the clearer the signal can ultimately become, and with less noise as well.

Analogue technology records waveforms as they are and translates them that way, as opposed to its digital equivalent, which samples and records waveforms first before transmitting them. However, analogue devices tend to consume much more power.

Analogue radios are also inherently more affordable than their digital counterparts. Digital devices can cost a lot of money and, because they are an emerging technology, new models can potentially be rendered ‘old hat’ within a relatively short span of use, whereas analogue technology requires far less upgrading.

The downside here, however, is that the end for analogue two-way radios is definitely in sight. Digital is clearly going to be the way forward.

Digital

Digital technology operates on a very different principal. While analogue translates information into radio waves (as we discussed earlier), digital technology instead translates the same information into a binary format (essentially zeroes and ones). This requires a shared language between the sending and receiving devices; otherwise the signal cannot be decoded.

Digital technology samples analogue waveforms, assigns a set of numbers to them and then records them. Ergo, digital radios are far less likely to be interrupted by signal degradation, outside noise and other interruptions, largely because most noise responses are analogue in nature.

Digital signal processing is almost instant, as digital sampling works at 8000 samples per second. The difference between digital signal processing and analogue is therefore negligible.

Finally, digital devices tend not to draw as much power as analogue devices.

Which one for me?

So, now that’s out of the way – which is right for you?

Ultimately, when it comes to two-way radio usage, analogue radios will serve you well, but not for much longer, it seems.

Start by looking at health and safety concerns. An analogue radio is easy to use, highly durable and totally instantaneous. This is, in short, technology that saves lives. This is one reason that these radios are still employed by everyone from police officers to construction workers the world over. The other reason is cost. Analogue radios are still much cheaper than their digital counterparts.

Digital radios have a much wider signal range and a clearer sound, but, as we said, they can be cost prohibitive.

Overall, if it’s outdoor, manual work (where quick, efficient communication is vital) if cost is an issue, if safety and security are major factors and if reliability is key, an analogue radio is a reasonable choice, but could be slightly short-sighted given the massive improvements made by digital technology in recent years. It may be wiser to simply bite the bullet and spend extra over the short term in order avoid spending considerably more over the long term.

If you want to get a jump on the competition, if you want to be up to date and have your workforce operate the best technology money can buy, then digital is certainly the way forward.

What about hybrids?

A device that covers both grounds is a great choice, provided that it is still easy to use in a crisis and bug free. If you are pushed, then a digital two-way is probably best. The technology has come a long way now and definitely represents the future of two-way communications.

So there you go, that’s our answer.

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What Is Audio Surveillance

headset. earphonesWhat would you do if i said I had found a earpiece article that isnt only fascinating but informative also? I knew you wouldn’t believe me, so here it is the enlightening, excellent and fascinating editorial

Audio surveillance is the act of listening to third-party conversations and recording them. This technique is frequently used by law enforcement, private detectives and government spy agencies. Most audio surveillance consists of either bugging a room, wearing a wire (earpiece (www.beautifulradio.net)), tapping a phone or distance listening. Each provides distinct advantages and disadvantages, depending on the situation.
Wiretapping is one of the most common and simple form of audio surveillance. This is preferred because it is highly inconspicuous and allows for two sides of a conversation to be clearly recorded. Small audio devices, commonly called bugs, are attached to the internal circuitry of a telephone to pick up a conversation. A signal is wirelessly transmitted to another device that records the conversation. The drawback of this method is getting access to a subject’s telephone to properly wiretap it.

A room microphone is another audio surveillance technique that often is utilized. This involves planting a wireless microphone in a room to pick up conversations. Disguised room microphones are available to look like pens, clocks, stuffed animals and a variety of other covert forms. This microphone sends a signal to a receiver, just like a wiretap does, and the signal can be directly recorded. The disadvantage here is access to some rooms and getting only one side of a phone conversation if it takes place in that room.

Concealable transmitters known as body wires are well-known devices that have been featured in many television shows and movies. A small microphone and transmitting device are worn under the clothes of a person in order to send a signal back to a receiver and record a conversation. This allows the person wearing the wire to ask questions and get specific details that simply listening to other people’s conversations could not provide. The disadvantage of this method is getting access to the person needed to be recorded and also concealing the microphone in a way that hides it but allows for clear recording.

Long-distance microphones are another covert means of audio surveillance. A parabolic microphone, often called a shotgun microphone because of its long shape, has a powerful ability to pick up conversations up to 300 feet (91.4 m) away. Its main disadvantage is its high sensitivity. It can pick up other noises and cannot function if obstructions, such as trees and automobiles, are between the microphone and the conversation.