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Monthly Archives: June 1970

MOTOTRBO Delivers Integrates GPS, Text Messaging and Voice to Cut Response Times for Tbilisi.

earpieceWhilst many of our readers are excited about some of my own posts, here is one i discovered while looking around tumblr.com it’s far better written than I could ever hope to accomplish. Maybe in the future I’ll get to this rank, you never know.

Leveraging Digital Technology for Fast, Efficient Emergency Services

Named the “033 service” after the country’s emergency response telephone number, Tbilisi Medical Emergency Response Service Centre operates in and around the Georgian capital. The service provides 24/7 emergency medical care for Tbilisi’s 1.3 million citizens from its 120 ambulances and intensive care vehicles.

Tbilisi Requires Advanced Digital Technology while Optimising its Investment in Analogue Radios

Tbilisi Medical was upgrading its fleet to provide new ambulances and equipment for its skilled emergency teams. As part of the modernisation programme, Tbilisi Medical wanted to replace its existing Motorola analogue two-way radios with a digital system. Investing in a leading edge, future-proofed solution would help it save more lives by delivering uncompromising clarity for life-or-death critical communications to improve emergency response times.

In addition to ensuring complete coverage across the city and its outskirts, Tbilisi Medical wanted to combine voice, text and position location services in a single device. Text messaging would allow paramedics and first-aid teams to record and share written details of a patient’s condition, prognosis and recommended treatment. GPS capability would give ambulance controllers a
real-time status of each vehicle’s current location and activity to minimise delays in despatching medical crews to the scene of an accident.

Also important was compatibility with the analogue radios used by doctors at the 10 hospitals in and around Tbilisi to where casualties are transported. The service needed a solution that was both affordable and could meet all its communications needs cost effectively. Tbilisi Medical’s long-term supplier and Motorola Licensed Partner recommended MOTOTRBO for its breadth of coverage, unrivalled audio clarity, cost-effective use of spectrum and depth of functionality.

Next-Generation Communications at an Affordable Price

The Motorola Authorised Partner set up MOTOTRBO base stations and DR3000 repeaters at Tbilisi Medical’s two control centres, installed a Motorola DM3601 enhanced display mobile radio in each of the 200 ambulances and built the GPS interfaces. Tbilisi Medical also purchased 60 DP3600 portable display and keypad radios for use by medical response teams working at the scene of an accident or in a patient’s home. The display panel allows users to create and receive text messages, identify callers, scan channels and monitor traffic. The DP3600’s navigation buttons allow rapid access to the radio’s intuitive, menu-driven features and one-touch programmable options. A large, textured push-to-talk button ensures ease of use, even when wearing gloves.

MOTOTRBO’s support for digital TDMA technology splits a single channel into two virtual channels
to provide twice the capacity of analogue. This gives Tbilisi Medical six channels for the cost of three and halves the number of base stations and repeaters needed. Two of the three channels are used to cover the east and west sides of the city, with each one providing voice and data over one virtual channel and GPS services over the other. The third channel is a dedicated emergency response covering the entire city. This has also been split to manage voice/data and GPS.

The Motorola Authorised Partner managed user training for the new MOTOTRBO system. Ambulance crews were quick to learn how to
operate the DP3600s and became competent users after just 12 minutes training. The eight control room dispatchers quickly adapted to the new system and continue to work closely with MZE to refine channel tuning and define and implement new functionality as they need it.

MOTOTRBO’s backward-and forward-compatible platform means that radios can be switched to analogue mode when ambulance crews need to liaise with hospital staff. Compatibility with analogue allows the migration to digital to be phased in over several years as part of the ongoing upgrade of its two-way radios.

MOTOTRBO’s built-in location tracking functionality has been activated in the Motorola DM3601 mobile radios to give controllers a real-time display of fleet activity. Dispatchers can programme the system to receive the geographical coordinates of each vehicle at pre-programmed intervals, on demand or upon pressing the emergency button. Integrated position location is of critical importance to Tbilisi Medical Emergency Response Service Centre and optimises fleet management, scheduling, route planning

and despatching. Working from accurate real-time information is critical for controllers at the point of decision and helps save time, money and lives.

The robustness of the DP3600 hand portables, that are also dustproof and water resistant, enables them to withstand sustained rough use in all weather conditions. The long-life battery also helps improve efficiency by allowing emergency crews to use the radios for around 16 hours before recharging is needed.

MOTOTRBO Helps Save Time, Money and Lives

MOTOTRBO has streamlined both routine and emergency call-outs for Tbilisi Medical. The improved speech clarity of digital over analogue means clearer communications, with messages getting through first time, even against the background of traffic in a noisy street. The wider range has eliminated communication black spots at the city limits while integrated GPS has optimised response times. Digital also enables users to make one-to-one as well as group calls, which means that medical crews only receive calls that are relevant to them. MOTOTRBO’s emergency and man-down features ensure that all users are alerted instantly to a colleague in distress or requiring immediate assistance. MOTOTRBO is also highly affordable and meets all Tbilisi Medical’s communications needs at a fraction of the cost of alternative solutions.

Tbilisi Medical is the first emergency response service in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) to purchase MOTOTRBO, but anticipates that others will follow its lead. MOTOTRBO’s advanced digital platform breaks through to new levels of performance and allows organisations to meet their future needs flexibly and cost-effectively. Tbilisi Medical anticipates achieving a return on its investment in MOTOTRBO within 12 months.

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Klipsch Gig

headphonesWith a great deal of information on the web about earphone (www.beautifulradio.net)’s it is hard to find the top and generally direct articles. here is a piece from a good site that i believe to be true, do not quote me on it but please read and enjoy

Klipsch’s latest portable Bluetooth speaker, the Gig, is a well-designed $199.99 (direct) option that features a swiveling kick stand so you can angle the drivers to face various directions. The Gig can get quite loud for its size, and delivers a more powerful sense of bass than most wireless speakers in this price range. However, on tracks with seriously deep bass, it can often distort at top volumes, which is a bit disappointing considering its pricing. Regardless, at moderate to high volumes, the distortion can be avoided, and the portable Gig provides a very sculpted listening experience that will appeal to fans of rich lows and crisp highsthough it may be a bit too sculpted for purists to enjoy.

The Gig is offered in a cream-colored motif as well as a black-and-silver model; if those two schemes are insufficient, Klipsch sells a range of additional color bands for $24.99 each. Measuring 3.6 by 7 by 2.1-inches, the 1.4-pound speaker, like the Bose SoundLink Mini, is on the larger end of the portable Bluetooth speaker scale. In other words, the rounded rectangular contour, with its built-in, swivel stand that allows for various speaker angles, is portable in the sense that you can move it around and it runs on an internal lithium ion battery. But its size might overwhelm a purse or small bag, and it’s not a pocketable option.

The stand, which is easily removable, makes it possible for the Gig to sit flat on a table top and project sound upward, or sit at multiple angles, though not all of the angles seem to stay in place. There’s a locking mechanism that holds the speaker in place only when sitting at a perfect right angle, projecting sound forward, toward the listener instead of up toward the ceiling.

Behind the speaker grille, two 1-inch drivers and two 2-inch passive bass radiators combine to output a hefty audio signal. A volume dial is located along one of the side panels, and it houses a multi-function button in its center that controls Play/Pause, Track navigation, as well as answering calls and ending them, and putting a call on mute. This button also doubles as the status indicator, telling you whether you’re paired or not, and how much battery life you have left. Along the back panel, there’s a 3.5mm aux input (a cable is included), the USB port for charging (a cable is included for this, as well), and the Power/Pairing switch. Klipsch Gig inline

In addition to the two cables, the Gig ships with a wall charger that the USB cable plugs into, and international outlet adapters for it. These accessories get their own carrying pouch, and the speaker itself gets a larger carrying pouch, both of which are black cloth drawstring bags. Klipsch estimates the Gig’s battery life at about 12 hours of standard use, and 4 hours of use at maximum volume.

Audio cues let you know when you’re in pairing mode, paired, or powered upand they are guitar strums, which will either make you smile or annoy you. Regardless, the pairing process with an iPhone 5s was simple and quick. If you have an NFC-enabled device, you can also pair with the Gig using this functionthe NFC sensor is near the volume dial.

The Gig employs digital signal processing (DSP), which typically ensures that there will be no distortion by limiting a track’s transient peaks at higher volumes. On the Gig, however, the DSP can’t quite restrain tracks with serious sub-bass content, like the Knife’s “Silent Shout,” from distorting. At this price, that’s a bit of a disappointmentdistortion shouldn’t be part of the equation at $200. It’s not shocking when you see the size of the Gig, howeverit’s bigger than many portable Bluetooth speakers, but a boom box it is not.

Despite the distortion at higher volumes on deep bass tracks, the Gig does manage to pump out a hefty amount of bass response at moderate-to-high volumes. The Knife track that distorts sounds full and clean, with a thumping beat, at moderate volume levels. Basically, adjusting either the max volume on the speaker or your device will solve the distortion problem on deep bass tracks, so it’s not necessarily a deal-breaker, especially considering how loud the speaker can get at medium volume levels to begin with.

On Bill Callahan’s “Drover,” his vocals receive a nice, smooth low-end presence, complimenting his rich baritone delivery nicely. The crisp highs give his vocals and the guitar strumming enough treble edge to standout, despite the bass presence. And the drums get a nice dollop of low-end presence, as well, but the Gig keeps the bass boosting on this track fairly subtle.

Jay-Z and Kanye West’s “No Church in the Wild” manages to almost completely avoid distortionat max volumes on both the speaker and the sound source, the vocals start to waiver a bit whenever the sub-bass synth hits come into the picture, but at just slightly lower levels, there’s no distortion. The kick drum loop’s attack gets plenty of high-mid presence, allowing it to slice through the mix, while the bass radiators provide a convincing sense of the kick drum’s low-end sustain, and a laudable amount of heft for the sub-bass synth stabs.

Classical tracks, like John Adams’ “The Chairman Dances,” also receive a subtle boosting in the lows, allowing the lower register strings to have a bit more body and life, but the spotlight still belongs to the higher register strings, brass, and percussion, which take advantage of the sculpted highs.

The comparably priced Bose SoundLink Mini doesn’t suffer from the distortion issues the Gig has at maximum volumes, but it arguably has less low frequency push at moderate levels. If these options are out of your price range, the Panasonic SC-NT10 and the Skullcandy Air Raid are both solid portable Bluetooth speaker options, but obviously, they’re going to deliver a less intense, powerful audio experience. For $200, the distortion is disappointing, but the Gig can be used at high volumes without the problem rearing its ugly headand it delivers a better sense of bass than most portable Bluetooth options $200 and under.

Golf Clubs: You use Them While You’re at Them: Communication on the Green

My basic review of a new earpiece it begins well, looks pretty awesome, is easy to run and really power resourceful, the radio earpiece is a top quality item. I’m pleased I bought it, read further beneath.

Golf clubs (by which we mean the locations, not the implements) are huge expanses of land. They cover vast distances, employ large amounts of people and are reasonably complicated environments to run.

In addition to the necessity of expedient communication between various layers of management, general health and safety concerns and the dedication required to keep a good course looking pristine, two way radios are vital to golf clubs for keeping staff connected with each other. They also help to provide security over large spaces and much more besides. Let’s go into all this in a bit more detail, shall we?

Two-way radios are easy to use, cost effective and supremely reliable. A mobile phone (or similar gadget) simply would not be anywhere near as dependable in the same circumstances, especially when one considers that most of a golf course is outdoors and therefore subject to weather, atmospheric conditions and other intangibles.

Two-way radios are rugged devices, designed for use on all kinds of terrain. When the tasks required are largely outdoors, it makes sense to employ the same technology that soldiers use in the desert or the police use in the city, doesn’t it?

Radios offer a fast and effective response to emergencies of any kind. Instant communication is a vital tool when it comes to reporting on a mishap and ensuring that help arrives A.S.A.P. Radios also allow staff to report on the condition of the green, relaying player feedback directly to management, ensuring a swift and professional response to any concerns. This, in turn, can help to cultivate customer loyalty, providing a good club with legions of devoted players who will attract other customers and thus provide the club with steady business.

But that isn’t all a walkie-talkie is good for at a golf course. In general, golf courses require a high degree of management skill and the key to good management is good communication. Two-way radios help to ensure that the on-course staff are prepared for the player’s individual needs. Radios help the other amenities of the club (shops, restaurants, toilets etc) to run smoothly and continue to offer high standards and quality service.

Without radios, a golf club would require several levels of management, if only to handle all the travel between spaces. The management of a decent course would represent a logistical nightmare. A long, leisurely round of golf (enjoyed by everyone from Larry David to Alice Cooper) could instead represent a stress-filled, obstacle-riddled game that many would give up on before they ever even teed off.